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Thread: Murakami Haruki

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Murakami Haruki

    New story in The New Yorker: Samsa in Love.

  2. #62
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    Early review of his new book, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

  3. #63
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    Whereas Norwegian Wood is permeated by a nostalgic longing for the perceived potential for individual dignity made possible by a vanished youth in a vanished era, Tsukuru Tazaki is concerned with a more pragmatic strain of existentialism that seeks to justify the manner in which the passing years inevitably drain color from one’s life. If Tsukuru is indeed on a pilgrimage, it’s less of a pilgrimage to find his friends or to figure out the truth but rather an experiential process of recreating the story of his adolescence as a narrative that can properly function as a suitable prequel to a middle-aged adult life that is less of an anticlimactic ending and more of a canvas that is still waiting to be filled with color.
    Seems interesting. Kind of reminds me of the sort of things Ben Folds sings about (not a compliment), but we'll see how it goes.

    I offloaded all of my Murakami to my sister, and she seems to be enamoured with his writing (she's read three books in about 7 days), and particularly with his short fiction (which I think is where his strengths shine and his weaknesses don't matter).

  4. #64

    Default Re: Murakami Haruki

    Quote Originally Posted by Vazquez View Post
    A new book to be released. From the publisher:

    "“The Strange Library,” which will be published in the United States by Knopf this December, is narrated by a boy who visits a library on his way home from school. An old man takes the boy hostage and forces him to memorize a large number of books. The boy eventually realizes that the man plans to absorb the information he’s memorized by eating his brain. With the help of a strange girl and a man dressed as a sheep, the captive devises an escape plan."
    Gotta admit, when I saw this story outline yesterday I was very intrigued. I think I'll give this one a read. One day, when I can find it cheap in a used book store. But it certainly sounds like an imaginative storyline.

  5. #65
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    The Strange Library was originally published in 2008 in Japan, apparently it's more of a children's book than anything else.

    Also:
    http://www.curtisbrown.co.uk/haruki-...-pinball-1973/

    Murakami's first two novellas, Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973 are set to be released in the US and UK in a single volume. I'm excited, Murakami long suppressed the publication of these outside of Japan because he thought they weren't good enough and didn't compare to his later work. I managed to find them online a while ago and yes, they are simplistic when placed against his other books, but they are pretty good, I liked them much, much more than Sputnik Sweetheart and Afterdark. They probably won't win Murakami any few fans and I wouldn't recommend anyone start his oeuvre with them, but for those who like him they are definitely worth checking out.

  6. #66
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    Great news. I've always wanted to read these two early novels.

  7. #67

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    I'm a huge fan of him. I think he's the most important Japonese writer of our era. Of course,Kazuo ishiguro is also amazing - and both of them can be compared to Yukio Mishima. Although I think he is an inrregular writer - because he wrote wonderful books and some strange ones - I really do love him.

  8. #68
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    I really like Murakami, but I don't think he is similar to Mishima at all. I cannot agree about him being the most important Japanese writer of our era; say hello to Kenzaburo Oe.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel del Real View Post
    I cannot agree about him being the most important Japanese writer of our era; say hello to Kenzaburo Oe.
    This depends on what you consider "our era." If you mean the current era of Japanese authors, then Oe doesn't belong to that. Murakami however, does. If you just mean "living Japanese writers", then sure.

    They are from different eras and considered to be from different literary generations in Japan. Oe writes in a very conservative (as far as contemporary Japanese literature goes) style and pretty much rejects any contemporary Japanese authors as not being "real literature." Though many like to point to things he's said about Haruki Murakami in the past, these comments weren't directed solely at him, he was generally discussing current Japanese literature as a whole. Also this is rather negated by him heading the committee that awarded Murakami's The Wind Up Bird Chronicle the Yomiuri Prize.

    He's considered a member of the generation that came after the "Third Generation" of post-war writers. A group of writers who were born prior to World War 2, lived through out, and then lashed out against it in their earlier works. Murakami is at the forefront of post-modern Japanese literature, that established itself after the void caused by the end of the politically charged 1960s occurred and after the deaths of many giants of Japanese literature throughout the 1960s and early 1970s (Tanizaki, Kawabata, Mishima. Murakami belongs to a newer set of contemporary authors who sits the concepts and definitions of "pure literature," redefining the term to suit their needs.

    At their core most of Murakami's works aim to represent the feeling amongst common Japanese of the post-Zenkyoto era (this era after the 1960s).

    In other news, he has a new novel in February. It is as of now untitled. It will be longer than Kafka On the Shore but shorter than 1Q84. In it Murakami returns to writing in the first person, as opposed to the third-person style that he's used in all of his works since After Dark.

    In translation news, his short story collection Men Without Women will finally be released in May of 2017. Although most if not all of the stories in it have previously appeared in English publications.

    Two separate non-fiction conversation transcripts of his were published this fall. Absolutely on Music) got a lot of press. The other (whose name I don't remembered) was released by a different publisher and received little if any press (likely because it wasn't officially sanctioned by his English publishers).
    Last edited by Isahoinp; 17-Dec-2016 at 07:51.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post
    In translation news, his short story collection Men Without Women will finally be released in May of 2017. Although most if not all of the stories in it have previously appeared in English publications.
    Do not expect a lot from this set of short stories. It's the worst I've read from him at this sub-genre.

  11. #71
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    As most of them have previously been released in English, I think I've read all of them except one. I thought they were great. It seems certainly a stronger collection than After the Quake, his other shorter collection.

    Scheherazade Is amongst my favorite of his short stories and Samsa in Love is great as a continuation of Kafka's Metamorpohsis.

    It was doubtful they'd have the strength of the works collected on The Elephant Vanishes or Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman as those two collections contain a lot more stories.

  12. #72
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    Have read only one of his short stories before, and I quite liked it. Might check out some other short stories as well, after I read one of his more recent novels.

  13. #73
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    Murakami's new novel Kishidancho Goroshi," or "Murder of the Knight Commander," will hit Japanese bookstores on Feb. 24.

    Shinchosha Publishing Co. said Tuesday the book will have two parts, subtitled "Emerging Ideas" and "Moving Metaphor."

  14. #74
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    Do we know of how many pages are we talking about? I know Japanese publications are way longer because of the katakana/hiragana but just to have an idea.

  15. #75

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    He/she mentioned in another thread it's supposed to be longer than Kafka, which was around 830 pages in the Japanese version and separated into two volumes.

  16. #76
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    Murakami claimed (during an interview given in Denmark during the awarding of the Hans Christian Anderson Prize) that the novel would be longer than Kafka on the Shore but shorter than 1Q84. A Japanese user on the Murakami subreddit claimed that the Japanese publication info gave the book a larger number of pages than 1Q84. So I really have no clue. Based on that I'd guess somewhere between 600-900 pages.

    I personally, doubt it will be longer than 1Q84. As with the publication of 1Q84 scant details are being given about the novel until its release.
    Last edited by Isahoinp; 11-Jan-2017 at 08:07.

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raphael Lambach View Post
    I'm a huge fan of him. I think he's the most important Japonese writer of our era. Of course,Kazuo ishiguro is also amazing - and both of them can be compared to Yukio Mishima. Although I think he is an inrregular writer - because he wrote wonderful books and some strange ones - I really do love him.
    Kazuo Ishiguro is British and claims little to no relation to Japanese traditions

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazuo_...guro_and_Japan

  18. #78
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    Default Re: Murakami Haruki

    Decent article on the main Polish translator or Murakami's work

    https://www.csmonitor.com/layout/set...siastic-Poland

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