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Thread: Your favourite painting

  1. #181

    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    If to say of hyperrealism I love it in pencil by modern artist Denis Chernov.

    Some of his works:









  2. #182

    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Ulybin Gennadiy is very technic in this style (btw he likes the nude genre).

    One of his paintings:

    Spaniard


  3. #183
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    But I don't quite see the message that the installation is trying to convey [..] It reflects a mass society mentality. [..] So you could read the installation as a parable about Maoism, if you so wished, an epoch when China went mad with conformism, and millions were killed in a blind attempt to improve mankind in the abstract, whilst physically killing people who raised their voices in protest.


    Well there you go. I would like to see this installation, but it's in the Guggenheim museum, Bilbao, so it doesn't look like I will in the near future.

    Has anyone seen work from Richard Wilson? In the Saatchi Gallery, I was really impressed by this work:



    which really doesn't come across on a photo. If you happen to be in London, I suggest you go and see it. It's spooky.

    And this, which has me puzzled, but also amazed:

    YouTube - Turning the Place Over by Richard Wilson
    and houses, roads, avenues are as fugitive, alas, as the years. - Marcel Proust

  4. #184

    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Quote Originally Posted by waalkwriter View Post
    I love surrealism.
    Waalkwriter, I thought that you might love these - I would say, poetic and original - works by Rene Magritte:






  5. #185
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Is it always the same man?
    By the way, I love the first painting: so meaningless!

    Salvador Dal? is one of my favourite painters. But I always wonder what kind of drug he took to make those paintings...
    The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.

  6. #186

    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Quote Originally Posted by Loki View Post
    Is it always the same man?
    By the way, I love the first painting: so meaningless!
    Have you seen The Thomas Crown Affair? There are a lot of men with such appearance in that film .

  7. #187
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Of Magritte's work, these are my two favourites:



    and houses, roads, avenues are as fugitive, alas, as the years. - Marcel Proust

  8. #188
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Quote Originally Posted by learna View Post
    Have you seen The Thomas Crown Affair? There are a lot of men with such appearance in that film .
    I haven't. Enough of that men!



    Paul (only to be brief/Left I his title out), the second one you've posted is really good! The only thing I don't like is the dead (or sleeping) woman at the centre of the picture: I don't really like complete nakedness in pictures. But the atmosphere of the picture is really relaxing...

    The quotation in brackets is taken by Richard II, Act III, Scene 3.
    The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.

  9. #189
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    Belgium Re: Your favourite painting

    I like the woman in Learna's Ulybin Gennadi photorealistic painting at #192. But the picture itself looks like a piece of kitsch done from a photo. Nothing wrong with using photos, Edvard Munch did, but the brownish colour scheme somehow doesn't do it for me.

    As for Magritte, I'm as sick of seeing his work as I am that of Dal?. It's been on student posters, sellotaped or blu-tacked to the walls of student rooms, for at least the past 40 years.

    *

    Paul Delvaux, however, is a painter, he too bordering on the kitsch, whose work still genuinely fascinates me. He too has been borrowed endlessly for book covers (such as those of the Flemish author Hubert Lampo), but he still intrigues me. Here are a few more:















    I wrote "bordering on the kitsch", but for me Delvaux just manages to stay on the right side of that danger to artistry. Because of the mystery of his juxtapositions. He is, of course, quite obsessive in his themes and leitmotifs: parks, classical architecture, unreal tram and railway stations, skeletons, coupled with nudes, nudes, nudes (almost makes Zorn look like a prude).

  10. #190

    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Quote Originally Posted by Amoxcalli View Post
    Of Magritte's work, these are my two favourites:



    Amoxcalli, I thought to post the second one but you are ahead.

    I think that his men look partly autobiographical:


  11. #191
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    Belgium Re: Your favourite painting



    Ceci n'est pas Magritte.



    Ceci n'est pas un banquier.

  12. #192

    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Eric:I like the woman in Learna's Ulybin Gennadi photorealistic painting at #192. But the picture itself looks like a piece of kitsch done from a photo. Nothing wrong with using photos, Edvard Munch did, but the brownish colour scheme somehow doesn't do it for me.
    Eric, hyperrealism is - in some way - kitch itself and the term "photorealism" says a lot of using photos. But as for this particular painting I would not agree with you. Brown colours only underline the subject of a painting, even the technique does not cover the idea ( although Ulybin sometimes enjoys it a lot but I must say that he can do it accurately).

  13. #193
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Colour schemes vary surprisingly much from country to country, culture to culture. For instance, I don't think that any publishing house in Western Europe would publish serious books in a kind of fake brown & gold cover. Yet if you look at any bookstall or shelf with Russian books, there are popular editions of serious classics in brown & gold. For us, too much gold is synonymous with trivial literature, crime novels, thrillers. Black & gold is just about acceptable. Brown & gold is kitsch. You would never find an English translation of Dostoevsky's "Idiot" with a surfeit of gold. Nor do gold teeth do anything for us in the West.

    The lady in the living room has that sort of heavy brown that is regarded as sombre in many countries of Western Europe. The vivid contrast with the white shawl is almost overpowering. Her gaze is histrionic.

    A similar thing is the way that in Soviet times Soviet restaurants would very rarely have a view out of the window onto the street. For us Westerners it seemed weird that restaurants in Tallinn (then part of the Soviet Union) would simply never have windows to the outside world. A restaurant was an artificially lit space, an indoor space, hermetically sealed from street life. Over here window seats are popular in restaurants. Watching passers-by is a pastime. Have things also changed in Russia?

  14. #194

    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    [QUOTE=Eric;76237]
    Colour schemes vary surprisingly much from country to country, culture to culture.
    That is true and good otherwise all countries would be analogous with each other. And I think it does not mean that favourite colours of one country are better that others ( I do not say particularly about Russia and Sweden).

    For instance, I don't think that any publishing house in Western Europe would publish serious books in a kind of fake brown & gold cover. Yet if you look at any bookstall or shelf with Russian books, there are popular editions of serious classics in brown & gold. For us, too much gold is synonymous with trivial literature, crime novels, thrillers. Black & gold is just about acceptable. Brown & gold is kitsch. You would never find an English translation of Dostoevsky's "Idiot" with a surfeit of gold. Nor do gold teeth do anything for us in the West.


    The lady in the living room has that sort of heavy brown that is regarded as sombre in many countries of Western Europe.
    I think that Ulybin associates a Spanish girl with the sun, sunburn and brown colours. We can see the same perspective in W. Allen's Vicky Cristina Barselona.


    A similar thing is the way that in Soviet times Soviet restaurants would very rarely have a view out of the window onto the street. For us Westerners it seemed weird that restaurants in Tallinn (then part of the Soviet Union) would simply never have windows to the outside world. A restaurant was an artificially lit space, an indoor space, hermetically sealed from street life. Over here window seats are popular in restaurants. Watching passers-by is a pastime. Have things also changed in Russia?
    Well... . Eric, I have never been in restaurants without windows moreover I like if there is a patio near it at summertime.

    Oh, no I have just remembered that I visited some places without windows. They were in one small town in Germany and one in Ukraine.

  15. #195
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    Those were some incredibly realistic paintings, impressive merely for their beautiful recreations of the world and their attempts to take the real and make it transcend reality, an unattainable perfection.

    Amoxicalli, I made a few statements that were too broad. I don't have the energy to pick up all the debate threads. I would merely accept what you noted about anti-art, like Pollock and others that you mentioned, such as Duchamps, and say that while it is valid, a valid philosophical and intellectual statement that has meaning, it is not art, but, as you classified it, anti-art. I think I had a lot of good statements about art on the aesthetics thread. Please excuse me for being a little terse, but my energy for such discussions is limited at the moment, and I'm trying to spread it around a bit.



    I was intrigued by that painting, Der Pokal des Riesen by Thomas Cole, one of the members of the Hudson River School of painters, also known for his Voyage of Life. It's not necessary surrealist, but its a beautiful painting, and there's a lot of interesting stuff going on, the waterfalls, the appearance of sailboats, the landscape, a beautiful painting.
    "I am not young enough to know everything" -Oscar Wilde
    "The best way to protect your place in this world is to do nothing at all." -From Ikiru

  16. #196
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    Poland Re: Your favourite painting

    Speaking of surrealism, I'm sure some of you are familiar with the work of Michael Sowa.

    I'm strangely attracted to his humorous combinations of horror and flimsiness; I also find his use of "natural" light to be quite beautiful:






    L.

  17. #197
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    For Jacob, with love: some Silmarillion-inspired, Photoshop-processed glory, :


    The N?men?reans (yeah, bitch!!!):






    L.

  18. #198
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    I can't seem to see well the pictures you've just posted!

    Anyway, Liam, the first you've posted is amazing: great atmosphere.
    I think the others can't be compared with that one.
    The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.

  19. #199
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting



    This is one of my Favourte paintings by Rafal Olbinski. Actually I like most of his work.
    "The spirits increase, vigor grows through a wound."
    Nietzsche

  20. #200
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    Default Re: Your favourite painting

    So many gorgeous paintings up already, some of my favorite Vroubels and Dalis, thanks for the Sowas, Liam. Anyone here like Joan Miro?

    My response to anyone who says Picasso doesn't do human emotion:


    Georges Rouault "Qui ne se grime pas" ("Who does not put on make-up?") And yes, it's a print, but...


    Georges Rouault "Christ Mocked"


    Rogier van der Weyden "Portrait of a Lady"
    "...in the spring there was clouds"

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