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Thread: Man Booker International Prize

  1. #81
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    Award Man Booker International Prize 2017

    The longlist was revealed today.

  2. #82
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    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017

    Very interesting names on the longlist. Some of the books are rather old but apparently have only now been translated (e.g. the Kadare, one of his very best books!). They should state the year of original publication and the original title.

  3. #83
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    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017

    Has anyone read Jon Kalman Stefansson? I've heard good things about HEAVEN AND HELL, which is book #1 in a trilogy. I'm thinking about ordering a copy.

  4. #84

    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017


  5. #85
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    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Ater, Lividus, Ruber, & V View Post

    Thanks for the link, Ater. I went ahead and ordered the book after reading the article.

  6. #86

    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    Has anyone read Jon Kalman Stefansson? I've heard good things about HEAVEN AND HELL, which is book #1 in a trilogy. I'm thinking about ordering a copy.
    Hisbooksarewide

  7. #87

    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017

    His books are widely available in translation in french. I purchased one of his books, D'ailleurs les pieds n'ont pas de poisson. I began reading it a while back, it was promising.. but I haven't looked at the book since then.

  8. #88
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    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by hoodoo View Post
    His books are widely available in translation in french. I purchased one of his books, D'ailleurs les pieds n'ont pas de poisson. I began reading it a while back, it was promising.. but I haven't looked at the book since then.
    hoodoo, your post caused me to dust off the part of my brain that still holds onto a handful of French words that I learned in junior high school French class. My best direct translation is "The feet have not of fish". No clue on the first word. I just checked on Amazon and the English title is Fish Have No Feet. From the reviews, it seems like the novel is similar in style to his other books in that it's meditative and poetic. I'm really looking forward to reading Stefansson.

  9. #89

    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize 2017

    D'ailleurs means elsewhere, so elsewhere, fish have no feet, I guess that I'd have to read the book to figure out what it means

  10. #90
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    Default 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    The 2017 Shortlist is out. I haven't read any of the books nominated and the only author I'm familiar with is Oz.

    http://themanbookerprize.com/international

  11. #91
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    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    Glad for Schweblin, she is a very good short story writer. Rare to see two pillars of Hebrew literature in a Shortlist.
    Really curious to read Compass, but the Spanish translation is still too expensive.

  12. #92
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    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    This year's winner is David Grossman with A Horse Walks Into a Bar

  13. #93
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    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    I wanted Samanta Schweblin to win the prize. Still it was a major success for such a young writer to be shortlisted along literary monsters like Grossman and Oz.

  14. #94

    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    I read his novel To the End of the Land in french (Une femme fuyant l'annonce), which won the Prix Médécis Étranger. I don't mean to sound mean or condescending, but it was terribly boring. I didn't realize that he was already in his sixties. Prediction, he will probably be a front runner for the Nobel Prize in the coming years.

    I'm not saying that Nobel Prize winning authors are boring, he just seems to have the right profile for it.

  15. #95
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    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel del Real View Post
    I wanted Samanta Schweblin to win the prize. Still it was a major success for such a young writer to be shortlisted along literary monsters like Grossman and Oz.

    Apparently, Schweblin was the bookies favorite. I haven't read this particular book, her first venture into novel territory. So far she's been a brilliant short story writer.

  16. #96
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    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    Quote Originally Posted by Stiffelio View Post
    Apparently, Schweblin was the bookies favorite. I haven't read this particular book, her first venture into novel territory. So far she's been a brilliant short story writer.
    Once she said she started this with the intention to be a short story, but it kept going on and on and her publisher told her to extend it a little bit more to make it a novella so it can sell better.

  17. #97
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    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    Quote Originally Posted by hoodoo View Post
    I read his novel To the End of the Land in french (Une femme fuyant l'annonce), which won the Prix Médécis Étranger. I don't mean to sound mean or condescending, but it was terribly boring. I didn't realize that he was already in his sixties. Prediction, he will probably be a front runner for the Nobel Prize in the coming years.

    I'm not saying that Nobel Prize winning authors are boring, he just seems to have the right profile for it.
    Shame, I got both that and "A Horse Walks Into a Bar" yesterday from the library. What was wrong with it?

  18. #98
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    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by hoodoo View Post
    Prediction, he will probably be a front runner for the Nobel Prize in the coming years.

    I'm not saying that Nobel Prize winning authors are boring, he just seems to have the right profile for it.
    I don't think he wins it. If Amos Oz doesn't win it Grossman seems unlikely to me down the line. Out of three Israeli writers who are discussed as potential winners Oz is still the most logical.

    AB Yehoshua will never win because of the things he's said about non-Israeli Jews

  19. #99

    Default Re: 2017 Man Booker International Shortlist

    Well, its been a couple of years, but I just remember a woman (whose son, an Israeli soldier, died) wanders around quite a bit on a hiking trip with her ex-husband. They are in grief obviously, but it jist went on and on.

    I'm sure that there is supposed to be some profound meaning to it all, but it didn't do it for me.

  20. #100

    Default Re: Man Booker International Prize

    I apologize for not having a more intelligent opinion about it. Here is an excerpt of a review that I found on Goodreads, It was the one that best described my feeling about the book : Initially, the story was difficult to get into, as the first chapter was very stylized. It introduced Ora, Avram and Ilan as teenagers, but the lack of quotes and the structure of the narrative was confusing. When the story then picks up in 2000, I was frustrated with the long, rambling paragraphs, the brief scenes that seem to go on for endless pages, and several disjointed episodes that contributed little to the overall plot. Perhaps it’s because I’m not a mother and therefore I cannot relate to the nuances of motherhood that Ora ponders, but her constant appraisal of Ofer became exhausting. I also found it odd that a male author fixated so much on the intimacy of breastfeeding. I admit, there was some great history of the constant conflict in Israel, but I think the author assumed the reader already had a general knowledge of recent Israeli affairs. I think the attempt at lyricism was lost in translation from the original Hebrew, because the descriptiveness was tedious, not poetic. While there were some aspects of the book I really liked, overall it was almost 600 pages of inner dialogue and contemplation. I was especially disappointed with the conclusion and felt that the characters and situations I had invested so much time in were unfinished and the entire struggle was unresolved.

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