Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 52 of 52

Thread: Vladimir Nabokov

  1. #41

    Default Re: Nabokov:"there's no music in his prose". Do you agree?

    So Donald Westlake is a great novelist (according to Banville) but Nabokov's prose has no music. Nabokov. Um, okay.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Nabokov:"there's no music in his prose". Do you agree?

    @JTolle

    Hello again, and hello 'JTolle' !

    That was my first post on this forum. I apologise if the question about Nabokov went in the wrong place.

    JTolle, it is genuinely exciting to have come across someone who is so familiar with the work of Nabokov as well as Banville. Here I am in London, joining a website to argue about what Banville had said. And within a few hours, there is an erudite reply, from Ohio. Thank goodness for the internet !

    I'm glad you left your first thought about this question!

    So would you say Joyce as the "ultimate singer" of prose? What got me really intrigued is that Martin Amis, in Experience, talks of Nabokov and Saul Bellow as his "twin peaks." And Amis's prose is wonderfully baroque. Don't you think so? As Amis says in the Paris Review interview, a writer's 'voice' is all rhythm. Yet, Banville simply dismisses Nabokov as having "no music."

    I think Harold Bloom would have a lot to say about this !

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    859

    Default Re: Nabokov:"there's no music in his prose". Do you agree?

    Yes, the internet can be a strange and surprising place. Quite the invention. Though I wouldn't claim to be "so familiar" with Banville, of whom I've just read one novel, and even of Nabokov I've read only a few works.

    I can't say for sure if I consider Joyce to be the "ultimate singer" of English-language prose, I'd have to throw Shakespeare in the conversation as well as Sir Thomas Browne or Jeremy Taylor and William H. Gass, who each have their own merits and who all sing in their own ways. But Joyce is indisputably one of the greatest lyrical writers.

    Sadly, I've read neither Amis nor Bellow, though I have a friend who encourages me every time I see him to borrow his copy of Time's Arrow and Bellow just seems, from all I've heard, to be a writer I would appreciate greatly. But that doesn't keep me from agreeing with Amis' in his observation about voice. Trying to think of one major novelist who doesn't have some kind of "rhythm" to their work, I can't think of any right now, but I'm sure I'm missing someone.

    Harold Bloom has the best things to say, I'm off now to read his Art of Criticism interview on Paris Review, which I appreciate so much for making all of its interviews available online.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    7,775

    Default Re: Nabokov:"there's no music in his prose". Do you agree?

    Pynchon, I didn't know that Nabokov was English. I suppose he's English in the same way that Harold Bloom's Albanian. Are you in London, Iowa, or London, UK?

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,480

    Default Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    Nabokov's first serious Russian work is to become available in English "for the first time." Not sure if this last bit of info is altogether correct, as there is a ppbk edition of The Tragedy of Mister Morn floating around already. But anyway, for what it's worth: the book will be released in March of 2013 by Knopf, a collaboration between two translators (192 pages).

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    7,775

    Russia Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    Hasn't it actually been published? This would suggest so:

    http://www.penguinclassics.co.uk/nf/...196329,00.html

    It appears to be his only play.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,480

    Default Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    Yeah, the British edition was published in July of this year, American edition to follow in March of next year.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    876

    Default Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    For those of you familiar with the plot and details of Pnin (I've ranted about it somewhere else in the forum), this poem by Nobel Prize winner Jaroslav Seifert, from his 1965 collection A concert on the island (on Ewald Osers' translation) will seem strangely familiar:


    A song at the end

    Listen: about little Hendele.
    She came back to me yesterday
    and she was twenty-four already.
    And as graceful as Shulamite.

    She wore an ash-gray squirrel fur
    and a pert little cap
    and round her neck sheíd tied a scarf
    the colour of pale smoke.

    Hendele, how well this suits you!
    I thought that you were dead
    and meanwhile you have grown more beautiful.
    I am glad youíve come!

    How wrong you are, dear friend!
    Iíve been dead twenty years,
    and very well you know it.
    Iíve only come to meet you.

    Please notice the ashes, smoke, squirrel fur, death, ghostly beloved and Hebraic context of the poem and recall how those are the main elements of the secret plot of Pnin.
    To sit alone in the lamplight with a book spread out before you, and hold intimate converse with men of unseen generations, such is a pleasure beyond compare.
    Yoshida Kenko

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    What a lovely poem, Cleanthess. And yes Pnin...what a touching, heartbreaking of a novel.
    If all the year were playing holidays/ To sport would be as tedious as to work--1Henry IV, Act I scene ii, lines 204-05, The Riverside Shakespeare, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1974

  10. #50

    Default Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    Just wanted to chime in and say, although this thread clearly died a few years ago, I've really, really appreciated reading it! I feel incredibly ill-read and uneducated by comparison. I've just been analyzing Lolita chapter by chapter (dissectinglolita.com) and your opinions have been a glorious aid in my research. I wish I had something as valuable to add! Thank you all for sharing your thoughts!

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    iran
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    hi there. im looking for a book about Nabokov's idea and the effects of Capitalism on his writings. could you please help? any source you know of on this matter? thanks

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    iran
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Vladimir Nabokov

    hi there. im looking for a book about Nabokov's idea and the effects of Capitalism on his writings. could you please help? any source you know of on this matter? thanks





Similar Threads

  1. Vladimir Nabokov: Lolita
    By liehtzu in forum Americas Literature
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 05-Oct-2016, 02:00
  2. Vladimir Nabokov: Terra Incognita
    By leyla in forum European Literature
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-Sep-2011, 21:32
  3. Vladimir Nabokov: The Gift
    By sirena in forum European Literature
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 20-May-2010, 19:02
  4. Vladimir Nabokov: Mary
    By Stewart in forum European Literature
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 18-May-2008, 17:53

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •