Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 213

Thread: New & Notable

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Exclamation New & Notable

    I've added quite a lot of new information to various threads recently: about new and upcoming books, poetry collections and translations; perhaps it would be easier and more to the point to have a separate thread devoted to such "new & notable" titles; and obviously, any book in any category (fiction, non-fiction) is welcome here, provided that it is a forthcoming publication.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Ireland Re: New & Notable

    Word up on a new Colm Tóibín book (or what, at any rate, appears to be a new Colm Tóibín book): The Testament of Mary.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Arrow Re: New & Notable

    To recount: new books by Hilary Mantel, Alice Munro, Lawrence Norfolk, Ian McEwan, Roberto Bolańo, Sjón, and even Samuel Beckett (after 80+ years, joke to say) to be released later this year.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Russia Re: New & Notable

    New translation of a Ludmila Ulitskaya novel out in October:

    Daniel Stein, Interpreter is seen by many as the great Russian novel of our time. Winner of the Russian National Literary Prize and the Simone de Beauvoir Prize, and nominated for the Russian Booker Novel of the Decade, Ludmila Ulitskaya has earned accolades internationally for this groundbreaking work.

    This innovative novel tells the story of Daniel Stein, a Polish Jew who narrowly survives the Holocaust by working for the Gestapo as an interpreter. After the war, he converts to Catholicism, becomes a priest, and finally emigrates to Israel. Despite this seemingly far-fetched progression, the life of Daniel Stein is not an invention--he is based on a real person, Oswald Rufeisen, a Carmelite priest.

    Daniel Stein, Interpreter ranges from before World War II to modern times, and from the shtetl to Israel to America. It portrays a life full of amazing contradictions and undaunted faith.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Italy Re: New & Notable

    A couple of new translations from the Italian (The Frost on His Shoulders and A Winter's Night):




    In the 1930s, in an isolated valley of the Pyrenees Mountains, an aging teacher reconstructs a bloody and tragic event that seemed destined to remain forever hidden behind a wall of silence. He alone can penetrate appearances and grasp the iron laws determining the lives of all those who live in this place--this valley where nature is miserly and leaves little room for poetic contemplation or an excess of feelings.

    He alone remembers his protégé, Ramón, a shepherd, who, no more than a child, fell in love with Alba, the only daughter of the region's most powerful and influential landowner. The rich and powerful conspire to thwart the love between Ramón and Alba, and in doing so they incite a feud that will extend beyond all reason. Thus begins [The Frost on His Shoulders] a vigorous, dramatic story of rebellion and a heroic quest for freedom.
    ...
    Set during the first half of the twentieth century, [A Winter's Night] is the story of the Brunis, a family of farmers from the Italian Padan Plain who have worked the land since time immemorial. And it is a story about the homeless multitudes, travelers, and tinkers, roaming Europe during the hardscrabble nineteen-twenties and thirties. In this expansive novel, reminiscent of Bertolucci's masterpiece 1900 in its scope and subject matter, these two worlds meet when the Brunis open their great barn and offer it as a refuge for those in need of a warm, dry, and safe place to sleep and eat.

    The barn becomes font and inspiration for a series of vivid stories involving sundry strangers, the Bruni parents themselves, and their nine children--seven boys and two girls--who will grow into young men and women during World War I and its aftermath. Told in the tradition of country folktales and framed by the devastating years of strife--two world wars and the years of fascism--these stories will delight readers from the first page to the last.

    Manfredi's A Winter's Night provides a timely reminder that simple values and a sense of solidarity with our fellow human beings remain of vital importance, above all in a world undergoing momentous and rapid change.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    7,775

    Russia Re: New & Notable

    This is a good thread, drawing people's attention to new things.

    Here's the cover of a new book of Russian literature by someone called Oleg Zaionchkovsky, which may be a bit of a mouthful, but the book looks promising, because it is about life in modern Russia. His surname sounds as if it has some connections with the Polish for "hare". I've only just started reading it, so no comments on the quality yet. But it's published in the promising new translation series called & Other Stories. See:

    http://www.andotherstories.org/autho...zaionchkovsky/




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    1,664

    Default Re: New & Notable

    Scheduled to be released in April..

    The book that became a national obsession and sold over two million copies in Japan ...

    the-devotion-of-suspect-x-275x275-imad7qzch4udxgxu.jpg
    Jayan



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Northern Minnesota: "icebox of America"
    Posts
    925

    Default Re: New & Notable

    This book has been out for over a year in the States and since last summer in the UK. Are you talking new release in India, kpjayan? By the way, I haven't read The Devotion of Suspect X, but I really enjoyed Naoko, an earlier Higashino novel. I'm not normally drawn to mystery books, but Higashino had a nice mix of comedy, pathos, and social commentary in Naoko that kept me turning the pages.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Guadalajara
    Posts
    5,144

    Default Re: New & Notable

    "The Japanese Stieg Larsson" loved it

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    1,664

    Default Re: New & Notable

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    This book has been out for over a year in the States and since last summer in the UK. Are you talking new release in India, kpjayan? By the way, I haven't read The Devotion of Suspect X, but I really enjoyed Naoko, an earlier Higashino novel. I'm not normally drawn to mystery books, but Higashino had a nice mix of comedy, pathos, and social commentary in Naoko that kept me turning the pages.
    I guess it is India release. The promotional mail came into my inbox was so convincing, that I was tempted to "Pre-Order". I think the hype after 1Q84 ( which had reasonable success in sales here in India) , could have triggered the onslaught of these books.

    However, this book(s) is the rage in country now http://shivatrilogy.com/index3.html , Book 3 of the Shiva Trilogy, 'The Oath of the Vayuputras', is tentatively scheduled for an end 2012 release.
    Jayan



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    United States Re: New & Notable

    Jack Kerouac: Collected Poems

    Poetry was at the center of Jack Kerouac's sense of mission as a writer. This landmark edition brings together for the first time all Kerouac's major poetic works--Mexico City Blues, The Scripture of the Golden Eternity, Book of Blues, Poems All Sizes, Old Angel Midnight, Book of Haikus--along with a rich assortment of his uncollected poems, six published here for the first time.

    He wrote poetry in every period of his life, in forms as diverse as the classical Japanese haiku, the Buddhist sutra, the spontaneous prose poetry of Old Angel Midnight, and the poetic "blues" he developed in Mexico City Blues and other serial works, seeing himself as "a jazz poet blowing a long blues in an afternoon jam session on Sunday."

    Many poets found Kerouac a liberating influence on their work: Robert Creeley called him "a genius at the register of the speaking voice"; for Allen Ginsberg he was "a poetic influence over the entire planet"; and Bob Dylan said that Mexico City Blues was crucial to his own artistic development.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    France Re: New & Notable

    French art historian Francoise Henry was one of the most important 20th-century historians of Irish art. In 1937 she visited the island of Inishkea North (Co. Mayo) in advance of excavations in search of early medieval remains. She found cross-slabs and enough evidence to return the following year and again in 1946 and 1950. She kept technical notes on the archaeological material, but also personal journals recording her observations on the natural world, native culture around the area of Blacksod Bay and the exigencies of working on a remote island where supplies and communication were primarily conveyed by currach. In this edited translation of Henry's journals, readers will delight in her evocative descriptions of the environment while being entertained by her awkward attempts to understand the former islanders she employed.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Default Re: New & Notable

    Some exciting new publications ahead: a lost play by Eugene O'Neill, a collection of poems by the Macedonian poet/novelist Lidija Dimkovska, Robert Walser's Microscripts in paperback (and with a beautiful new cover!), a slim new translation (from the Russian) of Marina Tsvetaeva's best, Homero Aridjis' latest appearance in English (Time of Angels), a retrospective collection (complete?) of the poems of Octavio Paz (translated by Eliot Weinberger), Selected Translations of W. S. Merwin (a whopping 500 pages of goodies!), a bilingual edition of the Chinese poet Bai Hua's collection Wind Says (I'd buy it just for the original text), a republication of Alonso de Ercilla's The Araucaniad (1569-89), described as an "epic masterpiece of Chilean poetry", Tomasz Różycki's new epic poem Twelve Stations (translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston), Michel Houellebecq's first published bits and pieces (mostly poetry) The Art of Struggle, and John Kinsella's interesting-looking book of translations The Jaguar's Dream.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Default Re: New & Notable

    A new book on the Golem legend:

    First mentioned in the Book of Psalms in the Hebrew Bible, the golem is a character in an astonishing number of post-Holocaust Jewish-American novels and has served as inspiration for such varied figures as Mary Shelley's monster in her novel Frankenstein, a frightening character in the television series The X-Files, and comic book figures such as Superman and the Hulk.

    In The Golem Redux: From Prague to Post-Holocaust Fiction, author Elizabeth R. Baer introduces readers to these varied representations of the golem and traces the history of the golem legend across modern pre- and post-Holocaust culture. In five chapters, The Golem Redux examines the different purposes for which the golem has been used in literature and what makes the golem the ultimate text and intertext for modern Jewish writers.

    Baer begins by introducing several early manifestations of the golem legend, including texts from the third and fourth centuries and from the medieval period; Prague's golem legend, which is attributed to the Maharal, Rabbi Judah Loew; the history of the Josefov, the Jewish ghetto in Prague, the site of the golem legend; and versions of the legend by Yudl Rosenberg and Chayim Bloch, which informed and influenced modern intertexts.

    In the chapters that follow, Baer traces the golem first in pre-Holocaust Austrian and German literature and film and later in post-Holocaust American literature and popular culture, arguing that the golem has been deployed very differently in these two contexts. Where prewar German and Austrian contexts used the golem as a signifier of Jewish otherness to underscore growing anti-Semitic cultural feelings, post-Holocaust American texts use the golem to depict the historical tragedy of the Holocaust and to imagine alternatives to it.

    In this section, Baer explores traditional retellings by Isaac Bashevis Singer and Elie Wiesel, the considerable legacy of the golem in comics, Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, and, finally, Golems to the Rescue in twentieth- and twenty-first-century works of film and literature, including those by Cynthia Ozick, Thane Rosenbaum, and Daniel Handler.

    By placing the Holocaust at the center of her discussion, Baer illustrates how the golem works as a self-conscious intertextual character who affirms the value of imagination and story in Jewish tradition. Students and teachers of Jewish literature and cultural history, film studies, and graphic novels will appreciate Baer's pioneering and thought-provoking volume.


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Default Re: New & Notable

    New translations of Saramago, Orhan Pamuk, Per Petterson, Henning Mankell; a handsome Pushkin Press edition of the memoirs of Petr Král; plus a new novel by Joyce Carol Oates coming up in early 2013.


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Guadalajara
    Posts
    5,144

    Default Re: New & Notable

    I've read the new translated Saramago and Pamuk's titles and they're quite good, not among the best of their respective works, but very illustrative early works by each one. Glad they can be reached now by English readers.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Default Re: New & Notable

    New translations of Bohumil Hrabal, Brigitte Lozerec'h, Bernard Comment (another Swiss author!), Jacques Jouet's experimental bus-trip novella, a rediscovered masterpiece from 1928 Lima, Peru (Martín Adán's The Cardboard House); and a new play by Derek Walcott.


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Default Re: New & Notable

    A collection of satirical short fiction by Norman Maclean translated from the Scottish Gaelic, a Caribbean classic from 1926 that will become available in early 2013 in a handsome hardcover edition, and a new translation of Goethe by Stanley Corngold.


  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    China Re: New & Notable

    New paperback reissues of Mo Yan's novels: The Republic of Wine, The Garlic Ballads and Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out, translated by Howard Goldblatt. The first one of these sounds particularly hallucinatory and surreal.


  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NYC, USA
    Posts
    4,350

    Default Re: New & Notable

    New biographies of James Joyce, Clarice Lispector, Yukio Mishima, and Yone Noguchi; upcoming memoirs by Paul Auster and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o; Christopher Isherwood's 900-pp. "liberation" diaries (covering the years 1970-1983); a book of essays about David Lynch; plus a new novel from the NYC-based Hawaiian author Susanna Moore.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •