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  1. #1
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    Award Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Get cracking!

    Early Nobel Odds
    Last edited by maidenhair; 30-Jul-2013 at 13:44.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Are we starting with that madness already? I was waiting for early August to open the thread

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    If [insert name here] doesn't win the prize this year, I swear, it surely means that:
    [the Swedish Academy members were bought off/ the prize is political /the prize is not political enough / the world is coming to an end soon /today's name ends on 'y'].
    To sit alone in the lamplight with a book spread out before you, and hold intimate converse with men of unseen generations, such is a pleasure beyond compare.
    Yoshida Kenko

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Given how the laureates these past few years, I would put my money this time on a female writer, perhaps Djebar.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by redheadshadz View Post
    Given how the laureates these past few years, I would put my money this time on a female writer, perhaps Djebar.
    Well, since Englund arrived as permanent secretary it seems that he's determined to end with the droughts (I know he's not that influential as an individual, just trying to make a point)

    2010: Mario Vargas Llosa/ 20 years for Spanish language
    2011: Tomas Tranströmer/15 years without a poet and 37 for Swedes
    2012: Mo Yan/First 100% Chinese writer
    2013: US can start cheering for Roth one more time

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    What do you think of the Neustadt International Prize nominees for 2014? Anyone among them that might be in the mix? Ilya Kaminsky is certainly too young for the prize. I notice that Edward P. Jones is an US American , but probably his oeuvre is too slim for any Nobel consideration (I haven't read him at all). Murakami: no chance. And even though I like Cesar Aira's slim books, I do not consider him to be relevant for the Nobel (but I admit that having read only a couple of his many dozens of books, I am not in a good position to make any trustworthy statements about him...). Checking wikipedia and the Nobel library it seems that besides Aira and Murakami also Mia Couto and Duong Thu Huong have a wide-ranging oeuvre.
    The Nominees
    César Aira
    Aira is an Argentine writer, translator and exponent of contemporary Argentine literature. He has published more than 70 books of stories, novels and essays. He writes at a fast rate, producing two to four novella-length books each year since 1993. He also has translated and edited books from France, England, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Mexico and Venezuela. Aira is nominated by Cristina Rivera-Garza, and his representative work is How I Became a Nun.

    Mia Couto
    Couto is the first Mozambican author to be nominated for the Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Couto published a poetry collection, Raiz de Orvalho(Root of dew), in 1983. His first book of short stories, Vozes Anoitecidas, was critically acclaimed in Portugal. An international jury at the Zimbabwe International Book Fair named his first novel, Terra Sonâmbula (1992; Eng. Sleepwalking Land, 2006), one of the 12 best African books of the 20th century. Couto is nominated by Gabriella Ghermandi, and his representative work is Sleepwalking Land.

    Duong Thu Huong
    Duong’s first novels, Journey into Childhood, Beyond Illusions, Paradise of the Blind and The Lost Life, became bestsellers in Vietnam before they were banned. Her next three works, Novel Without a Name, Memories of a Pure Spring and No Man’s Land, have only been published in foreign countries. She was named a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government in recognition of significant contributions to the arts and literature in France. Duong is nominated by Andrew Lam, and her representative work is No Man’s Land.

    Edward P. Jones
    Jones is the author of The Known World, for which he won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize and the 2005 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. His third book, All Aunt Hagar’s Children, was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award in 2006. Jones, an American author, also was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2005 and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in the art of the short story. Jones is nominated by Laleh Khadivi, and his representative work is All Aunt Hagar’s Children.

    Ilya Kaminsky
    Kaminsky is the first Ukrainian-born author to be nominated for the Neustadt International Prize for Literature. His verse collection Dancing in Odessa won the Whiting Writer’s Award, the American Academy of Arts & Letters Metcalf Award, the Dorset Prize, Poetry magazine’s Ruth Lilly Fellowship, and was named 2004’s Best Poetry Book of the Year by ForeWord magazine. Kaminsky’s latest manuscript, Deaf Republic, also won Poetry magazine’s Levinson Prize. Kaminsky is nominated by Lauren Camp, and his representative work is Dancing in Odessa.

    Chang-rae Lee
    Lee was born in Seoul, South Korea, and immigrated to the United States in 1968 at the age of 2. His first novel, Native Speaker, won the PEN/Hemingway Award, the American Book Award and the ALA Book of the Year Award. Lee currently teaches creative writing at Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. Lee is nominated by Krys Lee, and his representative work is The Surrendered.

    Edouard Maunick
    Maunick is a native of Mauritius, which makes him the first Mauritian to be nominated for the Neustadt International Prize for Literature. His first poetry collection, Les Oiseaux du Sang, was published in 1954, followed by Les Manèges de la Mer (1964), Mascaret ou le Livre de la Mer et de la Mort (1966), Fusillez-moi (1970), Africaines du Temps Jadis (1976) and En Mémoire du Mémorable suivi de Jusqu’en Terre Yoruba (1979). Maunick is nominated by Ananda Devi, and his representative work is Mandéla mort et vif (1987; Eng. Mandela, Dead and Alive, 2001).

    Haruki Murakami
    Murakami, a Japanese author, has been praised by the British newspaper The Guardian as one of “the world’s greatest living novelists.” Murakami was previously nominated for the Neustadt Prize in 2008 and 2010, and he received the Frank Kafka Prize in 2006. His most recent book in English is IQ84. Murakami is up for his third nomination by Deji Olukotun, and his representative work is The Elephant Vanishes.

    Ghassan Zaqtan
    Zaqtan is the first Palestinian to be nominated for the Neustadt Prize. He is a poet, novelist and editor who has written many collections, including Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me and the play The Narrow Sea. Zaqtan is the founding director of the House of Poetry in the city of Ramallah and has served as director of the Palestine Ministry of Culture’s literature and publishing department. Zaqtan is nominated by Fady Joudah, and his representative work is Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me.
    Last edited by maidenhair; 30-Jul-2013 at 13:45.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Damian Kelleher View Post

    I've mentioned my hopes before, but for reference, here they are again:

    Authors I would love to win, and think they have a good chance:

    Javier Marias
    Enrique Vila-Matas
    Antonio Lobo-Antunes
    Tom Stoppard
    Milan Kundera
    Claudio Magris

    Authors I would be fine with winning, but aren't exactly cheering for, I just recognise their strengths and like them enough but I don't love them:

    Thomas Pynchon
    Jon Fosse
    Nguigi wa Thiong'o
    Laszlo Krasznahorkai
    Peter Nadas
    Peter Esterhazy
    Philip Roth
    Gerald Murnane

    Authors I don't think are in the running, but I really like them and would like for it to happen one day and it may just be a case of too young/not enough books but we'll see:

    Goncalo M Tavares
    Jean-Phillipe Toussaint
    Jean Echenoz

    And then there are other authors I either don't know enough about to have a strong opinion, or don't wish to win at all and will keep my mouth shut.
    Any women you are rooting for? Or do their voices just not exist for you?
    Last edited by Uemarasan; 10-Oct-2013 at 09:38.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Uemarasan View Post
    Any women you are rooting for? Or do their voices just not exist for you?
    And is it obligatory to "root for" "any women"? To be honest I don't know any female writers deserving the prize more than - let's say - Kundera, Ngugi or Rushdie. Do such women exist? :P But we all know that the Swedish Academy rewards women from time to time just to show its support for gender equality. And the same will happen today (probably). :P

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Davus View Post
    But we all know that the Swedish Academy rewards women from time to time just to show its support for gender equality. And the same will happen today (probably). :P
    That is a really weird statement. We don't all know that. It says more about you and your literary tastes then about the Nobel prize committee. Don't project your views on other people.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Davus View Post
    And is it obligatory to "root for" "any women"? To be honest I don't know any female writers deserving the prize more than - let's say - Kundera, Ngugi or Rushdie. Do such women exist? :P But we all know that the Swedish Academy rewards women from time to time just to show its support for gender equality. And the same will happen today (probably). :P
    Completely agree. Let's cut the crap in here and be completely honest. This is about good literature and not being politically correct. I'm sure there are great female voices out there to be discovered by literary majorities, but Oates, Atwood, Djebar, Munro, etc are not worthy.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel del Real View Post
    Completely agree. Let's cut the crap in here and be completely honest. This is about good literature and not being politically correct. I'm sure there are great female voices out there to be discovered by literary majorities, but Oates, Atwood, Djebar, Munro, etc are not worthy.
    I myself happen not to be a great fan of Munro's, but watch out, because she can sneak up on you. You can, for instance, be reading one of her stories, feeling slightly bored by the setting and annoyed by the characters, and then you realize all of a sudden that your pulse is racing and that you're right on the verge of breaking through to something that hadn't been evident to you before. I think her unconditional admirers are more attuned to these moments than I am and experience them more often.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Davus View Post
    And is it obligatory to "root for" "any women"? To be honest I don't know any female writers deserving the prize more than - let's say - Kundera, Ngugi or Rushdie. Do such women exist? :P But we all know that the Swedish Academy rewards women from time to time just to show its support for gender equality. And the same will happen today (probably). :P
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel del Real View Post
    Completely agree. Let's cut the crap in here and be completely honest. This is about good literature and not being politically correct. I'm sure there are great female voices out there to be discovered by literary majorities, but Oates, Atwood, Djebar, Munro, etc are not worthy.
    I have no problem with someone having a list of worthy Nobel Prize winners that consists of men only. You just happen to like those writers and that's it. But claiming that women are awarded not for literary merit but because they were women is bullshit. No amount of emoticons like :P will make this statement any less stupid.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Alexievich now finds herself at 4/5 in the Nobel betting. Presumably this means that the Swedish Academy have privately already made their minds up and have all gone down the bookmakers.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Well, she was 4/6 so it seems that she's starting to slip!

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    With the laureate announced (Alice Munro), speculation is now closed. Please refer to the Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 thread to discuss the choice.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Damian Kelleher View Post
    I have read a couple of collections of Munro's stories, and while I liked them as I was reading, nothing particularly stuck. I find her a fine stylist with ordinary plots and nothing remotely resembling experimental qualities in her writing. I guess I see her as a writer who creates wonderful sentences about chairs and hair and affection and the satisfaction of sipping tea, and I want more than that from what I read.
    Seems like the most superficial assessment of an author I have encountered on this board so far.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Amos Oz and Nooteboom can both be had at good prices by shopping around. And Antonio Lobo Antunes looks good at 100/1 on Ladbrokes, and I think most would agree that any of these three would be deserving choices. But it's a crapshoot because there are probably twenty others just as worthy. And the small price on Svetlana Alexievich, and even on Jon Fosse, makes me nervous.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    A lot of changes on Ladbrokes. Alexievich is first now (4/6) and Ngugi is 5th (12/1). A lot of other writers have lower odds than before (for example Fosse is 16/1 - he was 9/1 few hours ago, if I'm not mistaken). So it's almost certain: Alexievich will take this (unless she's this year's Ngugi of the year when Vargas Llosa won but I doubt this).

  19. #19

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Davus View Post
    A lot of changes on Ladbrokes. Alexievich is first now (4/6) and Ngugi is 5th (12/1). A lot of other writers have lower odds than before (for example Fosse is 16/1 - he was 9/1 few hours ago, if I'm not mistaken). So it's almost certain: Alexievich will take this (unless she's this year's Ngugi of the year when Vargas Llosa won but I doubt this).
    Small P.S.: Mircea Cartarescu is 25/1 - he was lower I think.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Speculation

    Cartarescu (he was 100.0) shortening is due to some big bets from Sweden as Ladbrokes reported on twitter. As I was writing there, that's expected because he's a cult writer in Sweden, but the Nobel train has left the romanian station few years ago, Herta Muller at the wheel, and won't come back any time soon. He'll have a shot in 20 years or so. His profile is Nobel material alrite. Practically everything I read from him aims to touch as many universal bases as possible. That's not always a good thing but, anyway, the guy has written Nobel all over him. If it wasn't for Muller ...

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