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Thread: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

  1. #21
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by Vazquez View Post
    Curious story. When I visited the Nobel Prize museum, back in 2007, it was 50 years since Camus has won. Because of that they were giving a pamplet explaning about this year and the other candidates. The votes were something like 9 for Blixen and 8 for Camus. They said in the last minute - the very last minute - one of the members that were going to vote for Blixen changed his mind and voted on Camus, so...
    Glad he changed his vote.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Blixen isn't always great, as she can sometimes be humorless, but her best stuff (a story like the "The Sailor-Boy's Tale," for example, or even Out of Africa) is probably better than anything of Camus's. Camus is intelligent and lucid, but his work (with the possible exception of a story like "L'Hôte,") doesn't have the occasional magic Blixen's does.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Isak Dinesen

    Yukio Mishima

    Italo Calvino

    Jorge Borges

    Shen Congwen

    Interesting to hear that Shen Congwen was the favored candidate in 1988, the year he died. Naguib Mahfouz won that year and though I haven't read too much by him he seems to be one of the Academy's better picks, churning out compelling work after compelling work of all sorts of genres for 50 years. Then again, it's not the fault of Congwen that he couldn't do the same and instead was forced to stop writing, and his oeurve at that time was already really impressive. Given the power of his work and his story, he probably would've won.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by Heteronym View Post
    3 votes for Jorge Amado, so far; curious, I had no idea the man was so internationally popular and well-regarded.
    Probally because he was "sold out" as part of Magic Realism group, which Guimarães Rosa or Drummond (both much superior writers) didnt had a label that could be so easily tagged on them.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by Vazquez View Post
    Curious story. When I visited the Nobel Prize museum, back in 2007, it was 50 years since Camus has won. Because of that they were giving a pamplet explaning about this year and the other candidates. The votes were something like 9 for Blixen and 8 for Camus. They said in the last minute - the very last minute - one of the members that were going to vote for Blixen changed his mind and voted on Camus, so...
    Georges Simenon predicted in 1937 that he would win the Nobel prize within a decade. Hearing the news in 1957 that Camus had won it, Simenon (according to his wife) became outraged. 'Can you believe that asshole got it and not me?'.
    To sit alone in the lamplight with a book spread out before you, and hold intimate converse with men of unseen generations, such is a pleasure beyond compare.
    Yoshida Kenko

  6. #26

    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Too many overlooked in the prize's early years:

    James Joyce
    Virginia Woolf
    Henrik Ibsen
    Anton Chekhov
    Lu Xun
    Henry James
    Natsume Soseki

    Among the writers already mentioned, these should have won:

    Marguerite Yourcenar
    Primo Levi
    Italo Calvino
    Shen Congwen
    Isak Dinesen
    Julio Cortazar
    Clarice Lispector
    Jorge Luis Borges
    Yukio Mishima
    Anna Akhmatova
    Zbigniew Herbert
    Christa Wolf


    Personally, I would add:

    Junichiro Tanizaki
    Eileen Chang
    Cao Yu
    Masaoka Shiki
    C.P. Cavafy
    Akiko Yosano
    Aime Cesaire
    Stanislaw Lem
    Chinua Achebe
    Leopold Sedar Senghor
    Bella Akhmadulina

    And why not selecting from forms of literature yet to be recognized:

    Astrid Lindgren
    Tove Jansson
    Roald Dahl
    Osamu Tezuka
    Charles M. Schultz
    Last edited by Uemarasan; 06-Jul-2014 at 14:09.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by Uemarasan View Post

    Personally, I would add:

    Junichiro Tanizaki
    Eileen Chang
    Cao Yu
    Masaoka Shiki
    C.P. Cavafy
    Akiko Yosano
    Aime Cesaire
    Stanislaw Lem
    Chinua Achebe
    Leopold Sedar Senghor
    Bella Akhmadulina

    And why not selecting from forms of literature yet to be recognized:

    Astrid Lindgren
    Tove Jansson
    Roald Dahl
    Osamu Tezuka
    Charles M. Schultz
    We discussed Tanizaki in Recently Finished Books thread not so long ago. I'm interested to know which of his works do you like the most as some people weren't convinced he's any good at all.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by pesahson View Post
    We discussed Tanizaki in Recently Finished Books thread not so long ago. I'm interested to know which of his works do you like the most as some people weren't convinced he's any good at all.
    I've read three books by Tanizaki, The Makioka Sisters, The Key, and Naomi, and enjoyed them all. Reading Naomi was a frustrating experience at times, but that was because of the main character, not Tanizaki's writing style. I taught in Japan for nearly five years so I benefitted from being able to talk about his work with Japanese friends and colleagues.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    I've read three books by Tanizaki, The Makioka Sisters, The Key, and Naomi, and enjoyed them all. Reading Naomi was a frustrating experience at times, but that was because of the main character, not Tanizaki's writing style. I taught in Japan for nearly five years so I benefitted from being able to talk about his work with Japanese friends and colleagues.
    I've also read three books by him, totally different than the ones Stevie read: Captain's Shigemoto's Mother, The Reed Cutter & Shozo, the Cat and his two Women. The first wasn't that good, but The Reed Cutter is a tale within a tale of absolutely beauty and capable of the most vivid descriptions I've read in Japanese literature (imagine Kawabata). Shozo... is a completely different book, terribly funny, full of irony and sarcasm, dealing with the life of a lazy man, his ex and new wife, all of them using a cat as an excuse to attack each other and get what they want.
    Currently reading Shunkin's Portrait and enjoying it so far.

  10. #30

    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by pesahson View Post
    We discussed Tanizaki in Recently Finished Books thread not so long ago. I'm interested to know which of his works do you like the most as some people weren't convinced he's any good at all.
    I remember. I believe Quicksand was the book being discussed? It isn't a good entry point to the rest of his work nor is it the best representative. I agree with the posts above: The Makioka Sisters, The Key, Some Prefer Nettles, Naomi, In Praise of Shadows, The Reed Cutter, Portrait of Shunkin, as well as his short stories.

  11. #31
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    I'll go ahead and agree with the Academy's decision in the 1960s, that Mishima was far less deserving than other living Japanese authors, including the other three that had been nominated the year he made the shortlist. He was far too young at that point to have won, was obsessed with winning the prize to a nagging extent, and ultimately let his absurd nationalism tarnish his domestic literary reputation by failing in his government coup. Even if Kawabata hadn't won it's doubtful to me that Mishima ever would have when you examine the increased radicalism of his political stances and actions. Yes, he was a brilliant writer, but he was also crazy.

    Barring authors who easily never would have won because they were just too young or became famous after they died, here is who I believe should have won and could have because they were actually nominated and were still publishing to an extent when they were nominated :

    1. Henry James
    2. Leo Tolstoy
    3. Junichiro Tanizaki
    4. Thomas Hardy
    5. Robert Frost

  12. #32
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    Default Re: TOP 5 should (and could) have won the Nobel Prize

    Five South Asian writers that could have but didn't win:

    Raja Rao
    Saadat Hassan Manto
    Mahasweta Dewi
    Intizar Hussain
    U R Ananthamurthy

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