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Thread: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by OverTheMountains View Post
    I would prefer Louise Erdrich to be the next American. She has the power of Toni Morrison's writing in her story-telling, as far as I'm concerned, and Toni Morrison is one of the great winners in my opinion.
    Yes, indeed, forgot her.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    I have nothing against female authors. But, two female winner in a row will be, for the Literature Nobel Prize a revolution!
    And unfortunately I don’t think that the Swedish Academy, - despite the presence of Mrs. Sara DANIUS, as new perpetual secretary-, is really ready for that!


    So please, for this year, forget Mrs. Ann CARSON, Mrs. Marilynne ROBINSON, Mrs. Louise ERDRICH, Mrs. Joyce Carol OATES, Mrs. Marie N’DIAYE, Mrs. Dubravka UGRESIC, Mrs. Nawal El SAADAWI etc…
    Deus ex machina

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    I have nothing against female authors. But, two female winner in a row will be, for the Literature Nobel Prize a revolution!
    And unfortunately I don’t think that the Swedish Academy, - despite the presence of Mrs. Sara DANIUS, as new perpetual secretary-, is really ready for that!


    So please, for this year, forget Mrs. Ann CARSON, Mrs. Marilynne ROBINSON, Mrs. Louise ERDRICH, Mrs. Joyce Carol OATES, Mrs. Marie N’DIAYE, Mrs. Dubravka UGRESIC, Mrs. Nawal El SAADAWI etc…
    Just out of curiosity, at the beginning of the year the Brazilian Writerīs Union has sent to Sweden the name of Lygia Fagundes Telles (92 years old). At least she is a writer. Last year they sent the name of a diplomat or something like that...

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    I have nothing against female authors. But, two female winner in a row will be, for the Literature Nobel Prize a revolution!
    Yeah, but wouldn't it be amazing if the thought of two female winners in a row suddenlt stopped being as perplexing as it now?

    Anyway, this is the time of the year I like the most around here. It's time to check a few names I've never read or heard about. I just discovered there's a Brazilian edition of Louise Erdrich's The Round House, so I'm buying it as it seems promising.

    Regarding the Nobel, I think the only safe bet is to rule out any non-fiction writers this time. It doesn't eliminate many of them, though.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    With everything going on in Syria, I have a feeling it will be Adunis this year.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Let's not forget how political the Nobel Prize is... I go for Adonis, too. I got no interest in reading him, though.
    I gotta say, thought, that I'd love to see another woman winning, but, of course, not because she's a woman, but for her body of work. :-)

  7. #27

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Yes, it would be great to see a woman win this year even if one won last year (if only we used this same logic with men!). The problem is that we have an embarassment of riches when it comes to incredibly talented authors - both those with and without vaginas.

    Thrilled to see you picking up some Louise Erdrich, DouglasM. She's a real treasure. I'm thinking of going on another journey through books by women right away - three or four in a row - and one will definitely be by her. It is hard to choose which one though. If you look through her catalogue she, apparently, hasn't released a bad book, so you can't really rule any of them out as one which is worth reading.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by DouglasM View Post
    Yeah, but wouldn't it be amazing if the thought of two female winners in a row suddenlt stopped being as perplexing as it now?
    It would be great. I have nothing other to say!
    B
    ut I have serious doubts that it happens one day ...
    Deus ex machina

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    My choise will be the American John ASHBERY but I suppose that he’s too old now for the Nobel…
    If we are talking about worthy American poets, what about W.S. Merwin? He is quite old though.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Re: Ishiguro. The Buried Giant was disappointing and despite being good, I couldn't understand the hype around Never Let Me Go. Remains of the Day is a masterpiece, though, and apparently his other early work is more along those lines. If he never got the prize, I wouldn't consider it a snub, but if he did win I wouldn't view it as undeserved, either.

    Re: Erdrich. She'd be a great winner. Her latest, LaRosa, is supposed to be up there with her best work. I would be surprised (though also delighted) if a woman won this year, but if LaRosa does well on the award circuit, next year or the year after could be her time. Both Hemingway and Bellow got the Nobel soon after winning the Pulitzer.

  11. #31
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Hrabal78 View Post
    If we are talking about worthy American poets, what about W.S. Merwin? He is quite old though.
    William Stanley MERWIN would be a great pick too for the Nobel, unfortunately he’s 88 year old and John ASHBERY 89, so maybe to old for the Nobel?

    It’s strange to see that all the poet which the name come back every year for the Nobel are very old. So Ko UN is 83. ADONIS is 86, Philippe JACCOTTET is 91, Claribel ALEGRIA 92, Edward Kamau BRATHWAITE 83, Jude STÉFAN 83, and Kenneth WHITE 80… And for the records, Yves BONNEFOY just died at 93… Without the Nobel!
    Deus ex machina

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Well, no sense postponing that - you have convinced me. I just ordered THE LAST REPORT ON THE MIRACLES AT LITTLE NO HORSE from Louise Erdrich. I donīt know if itīs the best place to start, but I found it quite cheap in a online Brazilian bookstore.

  13. #33
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    William Stanley MERWIN would be a great pick too for the Nobel, unfortunately he’s 88 year old and John ASHBERY 89, so maybe to old for the Nobel?

    It’s strange to see that all the poet which the name come back every year for the Nobel are very old. So Ko UN is 83. ADONIS is 86, Philippe JACCOTTET is 91, Claribel ALEGRIA 92, Edward Kamau BRATHWAITE 83, Jude STÉFAN 83, and Kenneth WHITE 80… And for the records, Yves BONNEFOY just died at 93… Without the Nobel!
    And Nicanor Parra is almost 102

  14. #34

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Vazquez View Post
    Well, no sense postponing that - you have convinced me. I just ordered THE LAST REPORT ON THE MIRACLES AT LITTLE NO HORSE from Louise Erdrich. I donīt know if itīs the best place to start, but I found it quite cheap in a online Brazilian bookstore.
    I haven't yet read it, but I hope to start it in the coming weeks. I've got a small pile of books by women sitting in my mind, and something by each Alice Munro, Louise Erdrich, and Toni Morrison is causing most of the excitement. I'll start a thread about her after I've read this book as it will allow me to have a bit more perspective on her rightful position in the world of literature, but as of now I can only say that it is very high.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by OverTheMountains View Post
    I haven't yet read it, but I hope to start it in the coming weeks. I've got a small pile of books by women sitting in my mind, and something by each Alice Munro, Louise Erdrich, and Toni Morrison is causing most of the excitement. I'll start a thread about her after I've read this book as it will allow me to have a bit more perspective on her rightful position in the world of literature, but as of now I can only say that it is very high.
    From Mrs. Louise ERDRICH I have only read “The master butchers singing club”. This is not a bad book, but frankly not good either!
    In any case, absolutely not a book good enough to deserve the Nobel. Exactly the same as the books from Mr. John IRVING.

    Anyway, I mean that we can forget Mrs. Louise ERDRICH for this year… As discuss, I absolutely cannot imagine the Swedish Academy giving twice in a row the Nobel to a female writer!...
    Deus ex machina

  16. #36
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by redheadshadz View Post
    Both Hemingway and Bellow got the Nobel soon after winning the Pulitzer.
    True, but it was on 1954 and 1976! So maybe the things change!...
    Deus ex machina

  17. #37
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    I would love Rushdie to win, mainly for selfish reasons (I have most of his books signed/inscribed), but his last book was only ok. It was, sort of, a stab at fantasy. It reminded me a bit of some of Neil Gaiman's books, alternate universes and all. I certainly don't think his last output helped his chances,

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Let me pose a question. In interviews following the announcement of the last two winners, Sara Danius has suggested that an important factor leading to each choice has been the author's portrayal of people who have not been explored by previous winners. So, for example, Alexievich explores the lives of ordinary people living in Soviet countries.

    So my question is, are any of the writers you are suggesting exploring people not already explored by previous winners? In other words, to take only one of the names under discussion, does Ngugi offer us anything Soyinka or Lessing didn't explore? And to be clear, I'm not dismissing Ngugi, only posing a question.

  19. #39
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    From Mrs. Louise ERDRICH I have only read “The master butchers singing club”. This is not a bad book, but frankly not good either!
    In any case, absolutely not a book good enough to deserve the Nobel. Exactly the same as the books from Mr. John IRVING.

    Anyway, I mean that we can forget Mrs. Louise ERDRICH for this year… As discuss, I absolutely cannot imagine the Swedish Academy giving twice in a row the Nobel to a female writer!...
    I'm not sure I'd want to nominate Louise Erdich for the Nobel, I do find your post raising some questions.

    Specifically regarding Erdrich, The Master Butchers Singing Club is a departure from Erdrich's usual subject matter. I have not read the book yet for exactly that reason. I will concede that Erdrich's second novel, The Beet Queen is also unexceptional. But in her later work, Erdrich has gone beyond her role as an entertaining and insightful storyteller to explore significant moral dilemmas. For example, The Round House deals with questions of justice. I won't go into the details of how the American legal systems handles Native American Reservations, I'll just state that the novel raises the questions, if a nation's legal system fails indigenous people, do their own traditions offer them any alternative, and can the two systems become compatible. I well tell you that Erdrich explores those issues at ground level, not in an abstract impractical way, creating literature and not mere polemic. And the result is both ambiguous and emotionally involving.

    Then, more generally as to these threads over the years, what do people mean when they use the phrase "deserve the Nobel"? Looking over the list of past winners I cannot see any clear or consistent criteria. Let me take my own hesitation with Erdrich as an example. Content wise, her most recent books explore profound issues through complex and fully developed stories. My hesitation stems from two other aspects of her output: 1. her early books seem to be slight compared to her recent efforts, suggesting inconsistency; 2. her pose style is unexceptional. So? Past winners have been cited for a single book as opposed to their body of work, and none of the past three winners has what I would call an exceptional prose style. So, how do you "deserve" the Nobel? At heart isn't this the question what makes a work "literature" and not merely "writing"? Too bad Danius can't reply, as a professor of aesthetics she'd no doubt have some interesting views to contribute.

    BTW Septularisen, your list of poets in last year's thread gave me hours of enthralling reading. Goffert was an especially excellent read.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg H. View Post
    In interviews following the announcement of the last two winners, Sara Danius has suggested that an important factor leading to each choice has been the author's portrayal of people who have not been explored by previous winners. So, for example, Alexievich explores the lives of ordinary people living in Soviet countries.

    So my question is, are any of the writers you are suggesting exploring people not already explored by previous winners? In other words, to take only one of the names under discussion, does Ngugi offer us anything Soyinka or Lessing didn't explore? And to be clear, I'm not dismissing Ngugi, only posing a question.
    Last year was the first with Sara Danius, so the year before - when Modiano won - there was nothing related to "the author's portrayal of people", I guess. Anyway, even if she cited that refering to Svetlana, itīs just another reason, or a characteristic of her work, not a fundamental reason they gave her the Nobel. It would fit so few winners, anyway.

    But for your question about Ngugi - yes, yes, for sure. Lessing explored another very, very different aspect of Africa. So did Soyinka. Of course there are some similarities between Soyinka and Ngugi, as there are between Le Clézio and Modiano - in the thinnest sense. There are a lot more common ground between Ngugi and Achebe, thatīs for sure, but Ngugi is rawer, and better when talking about white people.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg H. View Post
    Past winners have been cited for a single book as opposed to their body of work...
    Not really, no. Usually they cite one or a couple of books they recommend, but they never (recently) said a writer won because of a single work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg H. View Post
    ...and none of the past three winners has what I would call an exceptional prose style.
    I beg to differ. I think they have a very exceptional prose style - Munro, Modiano, Alexievich. And Llosa, Muller - what adjective is better than exceptional? They are fantastic. And so are many names we are talking about here.

    But I see what you are trying to reach. The question is - among those names we are talking about as possible winners - is there any of them that has an amazing, unique style? Or a single work that is fantastic (I admit that helps)?

    By the way, a name was not yet mentioned here is Claudio Magris. I admit I didnīt fall in love with Blindly, but itīs a good book and itīs a fact his prose is very precise. He is very talented.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg H. View Post
    1. her early books seem to be slight compared to her recent efforts, suggesting inconsistency;
    I donīt think that is really a problem, and even less so as she overcame that, as you said. Eg Le Clézio and Lessing have some very weak books, but they won the prize anyway.
    Last edited by Vazquez; 12-Aug-2016 at 16:04.

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