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Thread: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

  1. #201
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleanthess View Post
    Continuing with the list by language of writers I'd like to see win the Nobel prize; when it comes to Portuguese, my choices would be two members of Faulkner's tribe (Antonio Lobo Antunes and Jose Luis Peixoto) or literary pasticheur extraordinaire, Gonçalo M. Tavares. When it comes to poetry, Adelia Prado.
    Any "chance" of seeing a brazilian winning went away with Ferreira Gullar and Ariano Suassuna deaths. They were really leading poets/writers on their fields and still active despite the age (albeit Gullar went down to embarassing political views that smuged a bit his image). At this point, the brazilian political sittuation is embarassing, nobody will give anything to us and, if it is not enoug how little portuguese language is translated and how little brazilians understand the politics of nobel treating it as an oscar, the embarassing attitude of the culture minister last cerimony of Camões Prize attacking Raduan Nassar (does not help that the writer getting internaitonal fame do not write anything for decades) before the public. I think, at this point Brazil is seen as an enemy of any liberal minded literary body.

    Adélia nice as she is is not as representative as poet as Suassuna or Gullar were. Perhaps there will be some review of her status, as the new generation of poets here making fame are mostly women.

  2. #202
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    SouthEastAsianLit: Their names have come up a bunch of times in past discussions. They won't win this year, but both are 73, just young enough where I wouldn't count them out in the future (after all, there was Pinter and Lessing, and then le Clezio and Modiano).

    ALRV: He's written children's books? Oh man, I think I've seen those titles on bibliographies, but I assumed those were about children growing up, not actually for kids. I can't imagine him writing kid's books, what were they like? And yes, I've heard the nynorsk thing before, I think it was about his writing sounds naturally more poetic in the original because he opts to write in that, whereas someone Knausgaard would always sound more rough to Norwegians (I think I remembered that right, I've never studied Norwegian).

    Cleanthess and Septularisen: Thanks for the new author names. Peixoto especially sounds really cool.

    Isahoinp: Thanks for the clarification about Mo Yan. Some cool obscure winners of that prize, as well as a number of usual suspects that appear/ed in Nobel discussions: Marias, Banville, Adichie, Ngugi, Lobo Antunes, etc.

  3. #203

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    JCamilo, well if Mo Yan and Vargas Llosa can win with their politics...

    redhead, yes, he's actually quite a decorated author for children's books. I think he's won four or five prizes. Oddly enough, he's written some books about personified dogs. I say odd because that's the same as Modiano's children's books. But Fosse has also written "typical" things like a girl being afraid to go down in the basement alone or animals escaping a zoo. One about a psychic girl who goes on an adventure with her fiddle.

    Probably the most philosophical ones are "Søster" (Sister), which has the wanderings of a boy interacting with the world (this is the worst synopsis, I apologize), and the one about Kant! A boy can't get to sleep, he's thinking about the universe, if it ends or not, and he sees a light on in his dad's room. He's reading Kant, and the two come to discuss his works, how if not even this great philosopher can understand everything, children can feel more relaxed about not comprehending the world. The title is a pun, too, because kant in Norwegian means edge or side, like the edge of the universe the boy is thinking about.

    This could actually be a hella long post, but to keep it short. Bokmål and nynorsk are just variations on how to write Norwegian, not speaking. Bokmål is closest to speaking the Oslo dialect and is very similar to written Danish. It's used by 90%? Outside of Oslo, more people speak like nynorsk, but they still write in bokmål. Nynorsk was meant to purge all foreign influences and get closer to Old Norse. This actually petrified the tongue because with globalization and what not, bokmål's been more versatile (like accepting loan words), so it's become the hegemonic force. Long story short, bokmål is what most novels are printed in, but there are dialects basically everywhere you go, so reading does not equal speaking.

    Nynorsk can sound very poetic if it's done right, which is how Fosse employs it. A lot of nynorsk words are shorter than bokmål, which suits his laconic style, and the grammar can be faster than some German-inherited stuff. I don't think KOK sounds rough.

  4. #204
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post
    Eco's work was an overwritten mess and most of his novels were overly long with numerous pointless historical tangents he'd include just so he could show you how highly-read and educated he was. He was also heavily involved in semiotics which isn't really a field to idea the Academy seems to have cared about (or really anyone else aside from Academics). Producing dense texts that induce head scratching and sleep doesn't mean he produced anything important.

    Meanwhile, Bob Dylan's work has had a profound effect on poetry and songwriting and his influence over the last 5 decades is monumentally greater than Eco's.

    Why are you randomly capitalizing the author's last names? That doesn't make it easier to read.

    John Ashbury is far too old and an American won last year. That's not happening ever.

    Penti Holappa: Too old and hasn't written anything in over 10 years. That's never happening.

    Norman Manea hasn't published anything in the last 5 years. Not happening.

    Ishiguro has published one novel in the last 12 years and hasn't won any international awards. Not gonna win.

    Ilse Aichinger is dead.

    Friederike Mayrocker is too old.
    It's clear you didn't take to heart Liam's earlier post/request about not handicapping or dismissing the suggestions of others. Instead, you puff yourself up as if you're some sort of Nobel Prize arbiter while shooting down other people's ideas (primarily because you have this anal fixation about age). Go back and reread some of your posts on this thread and perhaps, just perhaps, you might actually begin to understand how incredibly pompous and self-important you can sound. As Liam also said, this thread is supposed to be fun, and now I'm going against that by being all crabby. I'll finish my mini rant by just inviting you to feel free to let us less-enlightened folk wallow in our own ignorance. And by refraining from playing referee on this thread, you'll have more time to bore people face-to-face. Bonus!
    Last edited by Stevie B; 10-Aug-2017 at 08:52.

  5. #205
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Ater, Lividus, Ruber, & V View Post
    JCamilo, well if Mo Yan and Vargas Llosa can win with their politics...
    Not familiar with Mo Yan history, but Llosa and Gullar are a bit different. Gullar's work have been always linked with anti-conformism, radical poetical proposals (or how they call here, marginal poetry), so seeing him siding with conservative right wing politics sounds more a betrayal. (Even considering he once said to be communist). Llosa have been always on the other side of the spectrum, a bit elitist and liberal to contrast with Garcia Marquez and Cortazar. But sure, they certainly can overlook some individual change of heart, but I find hard to think they will do it now (as if they even considered doing before anyways, portuguese being a marginal literary language, brazil a marginal south-american literary country) because of the overall sittuation here. Usually, they will touch with gloves the chances considering that it may sound as supporting a country that is moving at high speed backwards after a coup and just had a official governament minister attacking an writer in a cerimony of the most important portuguese language international prize. I do not think they will waste a prize this way (unless someone consider Chico Buarque de Holanda, brazilian top lyricist but also an awarded novel writer with a considerable international fame and strong left-wing views but also from a very traditional and relevant intelectual brazilian family as an ironic option)

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Caodang View Post
    Or Ibrahim al-Koni. His "The bleeding of the stone" and "Anubis" are truly wonderful.
    Thank you Caodang for this very interesting suggestion. Does anybody know if his (apparently) extensive body work matches up to the few examplary novels translated into English? Wikipedia mentions no less than 80 published books.

    Speaking of al-Koni, I think the nominee list for the Man Booker International Prize of 2015 offers a very fine and diverse selection of writers:






    What do you think?

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post
    Eco's work was an overwritten mess and most of his novels were overly long with numerous pointless historical tangents he'd include just so he could show you how highly-read and educated he was. He was also heavily involved in semiotics which isn't really a field to idea the Academy seems to have cared about (or really anyone else aside from Academics). Producing dense texts that induce head scratching and sleep doesn't mean he produced anything important.
    Sorry but I have a very different opinion as you here, specially concerning "dense texts"?...
    Deus ex machina

  8. #208
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post

    Meanwhile, Bob Dylan's work has had a profound effect on poetry and songwriting and his influence over the last 5 decades is monumentally greater than Eco's.
    In this case someone must explain me why people like René CHAR, Yves BONNEFOY, Leopold Sedar SENGHOR and many others, never received the Nobel Prize?...
    So Philippe JACCOTTET still have a chance... ;~D))
    Deus ex machina

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    It's clear you didn't take to heart Liam's earlier post/request about not handicapping or dismissing the suggestions of others. Instead, you puff yourself up as if you're some sort of Nobel Prize arbiter while shooting down other people's ideas (primarily because you have this anal fixation about age). Go back and reread some of your posts on this thread and perhaps, just perhaps, you might actually begin to understand how incredibly pompous and self-important you can sound. As Liam also said, this thread is supposed to be fun, and now I'm going against that by being all crabby. I'll finish my mini rant by just inviting you to feel free to let us less-enlightened folk wallow in our own ignorance. And by refraining from playing referee on this thread, you'll have more time to bore people face-to-face. Bonus!
    He literally had a dead person in his list. But if you don't want to dismiss possibilities why don't we discuss giving the prize to Shakespeare and Homer? Seems reasonable. James Joyce maybe? Virgil?

    "Anal fixation with age."

    Yes, how dare I point out that based on over 100 years of Swedish Acadmey selections a nonagenarian isn't going to win. Especially when the Academy themselves have explicitly stated that they've denied candidates for being too old.

    How dare I have the pompousness to discuss the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2017 in a thread specifically created for that purpose.

  10. #210
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post

    John Ashbury is far too old and an American won last year. That's not happening ever.

    Penti Holappa: Too old and hasn't written anything in over 10 years. That's never happening.

    Norman Manea hasn't published anything in the last 5 years. Not happening.

    Ishiguro has published one novel in the last 12 years and hasn't won any international awards. Not gonna win.

    Ilse Aichinger is dead.

    Friederike Mayrocker is too old.
    I know, I know unfortunately... Execpt for the dead of Mrs Ilse AICHINGER...

    Some writer, despite te fact they are considerate as "the big" writer of there country will spend the entire life waiting the Nobel.
    This is the same for Kamau BRATHWHITE or F. SIONIL JOSÉ...
    Deus ex machina

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Marba View Post
    In a 2014 article on former winners in Dagens Nyheter Jelinek was asked "As a Nobel Prize winner you have the possibility to nominate upcoming candidates for the prize. Have you done that?" and she answered "I will always be there for Thomas Pynchon. He is the greatest living writer according to me."

    But I also remember, like you say, that she said Handke was the Austrian supposed to win when she got it.
    One day a journalist ask to Mrs. Katarina FROSTENSON from the SA which author is to read? She reply Mrs. Friederike MAYRÖCKER...
    Deus ex machina

  12. #212
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post
    How dare I have the pompousness to discuss...
    Discuss, not dismiss. I think Stevie is asking you to be a bit, you know, nicer, to your fellow board-members,

  13. #213
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    One day a journalist ask to Mrs. Katarina FROSTENSON from the SA which author is to read? She reply Mrs. Friederike MAYRÖCKER...
    Right. She's a great poet and from what I can tell still actively writing and publishing. I just think it's extremely unlikely that she wins given her age. As I said in my first post on this thread, their "criteria" for winning can change any time they select a new winner. So it's not necissarily "impossible" that she wins, I just don't see it happening.

    Y'all are free to speculate on whoever you'd like to. I'm not playing "referee" here or saying you can't discuss authors, I'm just giving my take on authors being mentioned.

  14. #214
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Liam View Post
    Discuss, not dismiss. I think Stevie is asking you to be a bit, you know, nicer, to your fellow board-members,
    I don't have mod privalges lol, I can't technically "dismiss" discussion of an author. In my mind they're "dismissed" as possibilities but everyone else is still free to discuss them. I just like to stick to the statistics I have in front of me

  15. #215
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post
    Eco's work was an overwritten mess...
    How much of his work have you actually read? I'm not his biggest fan, but I've always found his essays and numerous books of non-fiction (History of Beauty, On Ugliness, The Book of Legendary Lands) fairly easy to read. His novels got consistently worse with age. His political articles strike too strident a note and are incredibly one-sided, but also incredibly easy to follow and understand. Much of his academic work is dense, it's true, but I suppose that it comes with the territory. Is Bakhtin not dense? Lacan? Derrida?

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Isahoinp View Post
    I'm not playing "referee" here or saying you can't discuss authors, I'm just giving my take on authors being mentioned.
    Amen to that, Don't get upset kid, we do like you.

  17. #217
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Liam View Post
    How much of his work have you actually read? I'm not his biggest fan, but I've always found his essays and numerous books of non-fiction (History of Beauty, On Ugliness, The Book of Legendary Lands) fairly easy to read. His novels got consistently worse with age. His political articles strike too strident a note and are incredibly one-sided, but also incredibly easy to follow and understand. Much of his academic work is dense, it's true, but I suppose that it comes with the territory. Is Bakhtin not dense? Lacan? Derrida?
    Many years ago (I wanna say early on in high school maybe?) I read The Name of the Rose. I enjoyed it enough for what it was. After that I tried to get through Foccault's Pendulum but gave up halfway through. It really just seemed like he took the framework of a shorter novel, then did some historical research and tried to insert large portions of the research he'd done into the existing text to create a historical/occult mystery. It's been compared to Dan Brown, and as someone who used to love reading Dan Brown books (back in elementary school and Jr high school) I can definitely understand the comparison

    The whole "inserting historical facts into a text" thing isn't specific to Eco. Lots of authors do it and a lot of the time I find it jarring and somewhat cringeworthy. In Murakami's Kafka on the Shore there's sections of this that I hated. Doris Lessing's The Godlen Notebook to me also read as a much simpler narrative that had been embellished with political manifestos (though Lessing claims she wrote the book cover to cover with almost no editing).

    I guess I wasn't a specific enough. It's not "bad writing" in the sense that it's dense and deals with history and religion, I just don't see it having a lasting social or literary impact.

    I've never read his non-fiction or academic work. The little experience I've had with semiotics didn't interest me at all.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    It wouldn't surprise me if it really went to a dead author in the future. I mean, hey , with Sarah Danius in the committee, anything is possible.

    Firstly, I'd dismiss Shakespeare right away on grounds that he wasn't dissident. His ambiguous relationship with the Tudor regime is not going to win him the Swedish Academy's sympathy. There were hundreds, maybe thousands of people who were in prison at his time and he didn't lift a finger (or tongue) to speak out for them. He did not do anything to criticize the absolutist monarchy and ask for democracy. Neither did he condemn the tyrannical rule of Henry VIII or the colonization of America by England. If you ask me, Sir Thomas More is the one who deserves the Nobel in Literature, not that monarchy hack Shakespeare.

    Homer is most likely a pseudonym. And that's the smallest problem here. There's no proof he actually existed. Not to mention that he glamorizes violence and war. He's hardly a feminist either, his portrayal of women as the cause of wars is outrageous. All the odds are against him.

    Dante - hello? This guy literally put the prophet of Islam in one of Hell's circles in his highly problematic work Inferno. The Nobel Academy wouldn't want to anger 2 billion believers, unless they're Christian, of course.

    Kafka - He's under 40 so no.

    Dostoevsky - I don't know any reason why he shouldn't win but the Academy likes to ignore great writers so...

    P.S. I'm not ridiculing anybody here, I just thought this was a fun thing to do, since most of the time we're either dead serious or fighting here.
    _____

    Jokes aside, I've recently finished a book by Samanta Schweblin and she seemed like an interesting autrix () to me. I haven't read anything else by her so I can't say if her other works are as good or unique as Fever Dream. In fact I had expected her to win this year's Man Booker International. Maybe senor del Real can tell us more about her when decides to participate in the discussion, since he seems to have read more from her.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by redheadshadz View Post
    I think Golding won with just a few votes (close enough that the night before the announcement, he received a call saying the SA was at a deadlock about their decision and he had a 50/50 chance of winning), and due to the uproar that year, to reassure Golding, one academy member confided to him that a fair amount of votes had been even closer. I could be slightly misremembering the margin he won by, but that's how it went down according to the biography The Man Who Wrote Lord of the Flies.
    I have read this story once : In 1983 the SA don’t arrive to take a decision to give the Prize to the French writer Claude SIMON or the poet Jaroslav SEIFERT, so they decide to give the Prize to a third man… William GOLDING!

    In 1984 Jaroslav SEFERT received the prize and then, in 1985, Claude SIMON.
    Deus ex machina

  20. #220

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2017 Speculation

    kadare, that was the best post. Cheers. Right up there with last year's thread when Daniel said something like, "We'll have to wait and see what Sara says."

    Speaking of Daniel, I hope he's doing well. Hasn't posted for a while, and he's normally one of the most active in nobel speculations.

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