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Thread: Charles Dickens

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Oh! You scared me for a minute!

  2. #22

    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Um, Hard Times is Dickens's only 'Condition of England' novel, but most novels of the time, surely, 'deal' with 'social issues' in some way or other, if only by exclusion?

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    Last edited by lionel; 23-Feb-2010 at 22:04.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Of course. I'm sure Loki knows that. That's why his post startled me. see post #19.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    I'm sorry, I just got confused! Fortunately I got confused here and not last year at my English Literature exam, when the lecturer asked me to talk about Hard Times!
    The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    I've started reading Dickens after I watched BBC's adaptation of "Our Mutual Friend".
    First, I read "Our Mutual Friend", of course. Two characters impressed me the most: Eugene Wrayburn (young gentleman and barrister, with no particular interests in the world what so ever) and Bradley Headstone (deranged schoolmaster). They were potraited by Dickens perfectly.

    After that I read "Martin Chuzzlewit". I've just loved Seth Pecksniff. He's so hilarious.

    Now, I have "Great Expectations" on my shelf, waiting to be read.
    The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it... I can resist everything but temptation.Oscar Wilde

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Quote Originally Posted by rictorr110 View Post
    I have just begun to read Charles Dickens at 33 and I have to say that I love the way he writes. It's true ,as some say, he is a bit long winded but when he gives you glimpses of a setting or a person he seems to be able to catch the essence of that person or place. It is almost as if he imbues it with a soul. His prose is worth it!

    I also think it takes a certain level of maturity to really grasp what he is saying. His characters are so rich! Best of all.. he seems to be at once sharply observant of people and their faults but at the same time gentle in making fun of their purely human folly.

    I am at this time reading David Copperfield and loved Tale of Two Cites and Great Expectations!
    I completely agree, Dickens has such a particulary way of writing that "catch the essence of that person or place."

    And yes he meanders a bit in his prose but it is nonetheless, in my opinion, there to inject more life, reality, "soul", essence into the story.

    Of course Dickens isn't for everyone, not every person is going to like the same book, writing style or author. But for those who do get a chance and want to put their mind into it, read David Copperfield, it is marvelous, full of determination and life. Great Expectations is also a well known great.

  7. #27
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    England Re: Charles Dickens

    Two things:

    - The dialect was often that of the East End of London. Many immigrants there were Eastern European Jews. Hence all this "vooden" stuff. Yiddish, and all that. Like the accents from the Indian sub-continent nowadays in the West Riding and West Midlands. Dickens didn't just make it up to annoy 21st-century readers.

    - Dickens wrote instalments for the newspapers. So in order to get paid he had to smear the story out over umpteen episodes. That may very well be why Dickens didn't [want to] get to the point quickly.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    A new Charles Dickens biography will be published soon:

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/arts-e...ions-1.1082581

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    If you're a fan of Charles Dickens and if you have, or think you have, any skill at editing and proof-reading, why not join in this project to digitise the three billion words in his weekly magazine.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011...-words-project

    Who knew that much of Household Words was written by Dickens's son-in-law Charlie Collins - brother of Wilkie Collins?
    Who knew that Dickens commissioned the novelist Anthony Trollope's brother Thomas Trollope to act as a foreign correspondent filing reports on the massacres in the 2nd Italian War of Independence against the Austrian Empire in 1859?

    It would be difficult to over-estimate Dickens's importance as a writer and journalist in 19th-century Britain.

    Harry

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    I do proofreading for Distributed Proofreaders, which digitizes books for the Gutenberg Project (on-line, out of print books). Household Words is one of the periodicals we work on. Punch and The Strand are also done.

  11. #31
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    England Re: Charles Dickens

    I see that the Swede, Henning Mankell, of Wallander fame, has written the introduction to the latest Vintage Classics edition of Oliver Twist. In case you had forgotten, this year is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Dickens (as well as the 100th anniversary of the death of the Swedish dramatist and novelist August Strindberg).

    Why Vintage chose Mankell may just have something to do with his fame as a crime novelist - though I don't think Dickens can be classified as one.

    See:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/c...nded-More.html

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Lest we forget, Google is here to help us. I didn't know that he was born on February 7th 1812. Reading about Dickens has made me want to read a novel of his.
    Last September I was in London, and I wanted to visit (again) Dickens's Museum, but when I arrived there it was closed. Now that I know that this year is the bicentenary of his birth, I think that it was closed because they were preparing the house for the cultural events of 2012.



    PS: 2012 must be a great year in London, with the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II, the Olympics and the 200th anniversary of the birth of Dickens (Charles, of course).
    The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.

  13. #33
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Back in the days when we had a sort of book club here, I managed to convince a couple of other members to read Oliver Twist and comment on it. Dickens' anger, his rage at the evil institutions of his time was noted with surprise. I think it will always have that power to surprise and compel us to read on.
    "My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful, and optimistic. And we’ll change the world."--Jack Layton

  14. #34
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    England Re: Charles Dickens

    So, Lenz, what happened to the "sort of book club"? Wasn't it killed by apathy? Whose fault is that?

    Nothing wrong with Dickens. But you can buy those cheap Wordsworth editions, then set up your own discussion thread here on the WLF for the Dickens novel that interests you most. He wrote enough.

  15. #35
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Dickens's Best Novel vs. Dickens's Greatest Novel; but both lists concur: Bleak House is # 1!

  16. #36
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    England Re: Charles Dickens

    Does anyone feel that the magic fact that Dickens was born 200 years ago last February has made any difference this year to Dickens events, Dickens souvenirs, Dickens readings, Dickens publications, etc?

  17. #37
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Dickens was of course a sensational writer, however I am surprised people believe he was against everything within Victorian society. His characters and the consequences that befall them show that he was racist and sexist. He ensured that any 'rebellious' women were punished emphasising the view of 'The Fallen Woman' at the time, for example Nancy in Oliver Twist. He saves those who are inherently good, or have reached their circumstances through no fault of their own. Anybody else is entirely disposable. However if you look at this from another angle, he may have wrote like this because the Victorians would not have accepted people like Nancy having a 'happily ever after'. Although this does not excuse Dickens' penchant for visiting public hangings with snacks...

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Charles Dickens

    Dunno if Dickens was racist or sexist, but to me, Charles Dickens' writings always seemed like he was trying to appease the Victorian readers.

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