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Thread: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

  1. #41
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by pesahson View Post
    Alexievich receiving the Nobel would be amazing as no one was awarded it for non-fiction yet, I don't think.
    Plenty of people were awarded the Nobel prize in literature mostly on account of their non-fiction work.

    Historians: Mommsen (1902); Churchill (1953) - even though the Nobel blurb also mentioned Churchill's "oratory".

    Philosophers/essayists: Eucken (1908); Bergson (1927); Russell (1950); Sartre (1964) - though of course Sartre also wrote plenty of literature (novels, plays...). Also, I've often heard that Canetti (1981) was better know for his essays than for his purely literary work.
    Last edited by Corswandt; 31-Jul-2014 at 18:57.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Heteronym View Post
    The Swedish Academy urgently needs to award a heavy-weight of letters, and that means very few choices: Edward Albee, Milan Kundera, Philip Roth, William H. Gass, António Lobo Antunes...
    Even though I believe (hope?) that the Swedish Academy under Englund has apparently lost some of its penchant for tokenistic PC awards for deservedly obscure middlebrow chest-thumpers/peddlers of oppression pr0n/expats and victims of persecution, I still don't think they really care all that much for awarding big name, widely recognised writers.

    I think they may go for a playwright this year. No idea who. There's Fosse, and then I can only name Albee and Michael Frayn, but I'm the only one who ever mentions the latter here, so I doubt he is/was ever in contention.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Corswandt View Post
    ...penchant for tokenistic PC awards for deservedly obscure middlebrow chest-thumpers/peddlers of oppression pr0n/expats and victims of persecution...
    Corswandt, you get my award for the most arrogant and insensitive post of the year. Are Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, and others also "peddlers of oppression porn" because they had the gall to write about their concentration camp experiences? Should they have just shut up and taken it?

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    Daniel, Luis Goytisolo's name seems to come up as a potential Nobel winner every year, but I've yet to see any English translations of his work. Maybe you or Bubba could take on that challenge?
    We need a real brave person to translate Goytisolo's major achievement Antagonía. For the first time ever, all four novels were published together a couple of years ago with a total of 1,120 pages.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    Corswandt, you get my award for the most arrogant and insensitive post of the year. Are Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, and others also "peddlers of oppression porn" because they had the gall to write about their concentration camp experiences? Should they have just shut up and taken it?
    While Corswandt's comment was crass, I do see his point. It's not that those writers should've "shut up and taken it," but that it's a little annoying when a bunch of authors all writing about their oppression win the Nobel without much space in between when there are writers much, much better at their craft out there who have yet to be awarded.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel del Real View Post
    Ok, let's see the real possibilities for a Spanish writing author to get the Nobel.

    In my opinion, strong candidates right now are in Spain. You have plenty options to choose from, all of them with international recognition, the right age and a more than respectable corpus under their arms. Juan Goytisolo, Luis Goytisolo, Juan Marsé, Enrique Vila-Matas, Javier Marías, Antonio Muñoz Molina. Two or more from this group should win the Nobel the next 10 years.

    Latin American chances vanished after MVLL got it back in 2010 and Fuentes died in 2012, specially for prose writers. If I had to choose a novelist it would be Ricardo Piglia. I see him stronger than Cesar Aira, who I don't think his fragmented works can be truly appreciated by the Academy. Piglia is also experimental and could be considered post modernist but he knows his craft, he's always in command and Respiración Artificial is a true masterwork. Jorge Edwards would be a good choice, though I haven't read much by him. He is also from the old guard.
    Mexico is going through a generational change. Old writers alive like Fernando del Paso, Sergio Pitol and Elena Poniatowksa don't have the necessary international stature for prizes like this. The younger generation is still between their late 40-50's, and although really promissory, you still need from 10 to 20 years to see if they developed accordingly to expectations: Jorge Volpi, Ignacio Padilla, David Toscana, Álvaro Enrigue, Guadalupe Nettel, etc.

    For poetry, my two favorite perennial candidates died last year. José Emilio Pacheco & Juan Gelmán. However, if the prize goes to Latin America, it has to go to a poet, because we still have Ernesto Cardenal (89) and Nicanor Parra (99) alive, our ancient masters of poetry. Because of their age, don't see it happening.
    I completely agree with you here.
    Another candidate for Spain could be M. Alvaro POMBO.
    I know what you think about Mrs Isabel ALLENDE so no comment on her... but what about Mrs. Claribel ALEGRIA from Nicaragua?...
    Just for the records, M. Juan GELMAN died beginning of this year (14 January 2014) not last year... and unfortunately without the Nobel!!!

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Heteronym View Post
    They must have sent the intern who brings the coffee to do the checking in North America, if Alice Munro was all he found.

    The Swedish Academy urgently needs to award a heavy-weight of letters, and that means very few choices: Edward Albee, Milan Kundera, Philip Roth, William H. Gass, António Lobo Antunes...
    Umberto ECO ; Peter NADAS ; ADONIS, Amos OZ, Claudio MAGRIS ; Haruki MURAKAMI ; Salman RUSHDIE ; Don DeLILLO ; Hans Magnus ENZENSBERGER ; Richrd FORD ; Nuruddin FARAH ; Isamïl KADARÉ ; Philippe JACCOTTET, Cees NOOTEBOOM, Ngugi Wa THIONG'O, Ko UN ; John ASHBERY ;etc etc...

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    Corswandt, you get my award for the most arrogant and insensitive post of the year. Are Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, and others also "peddlers of oppression porn" because they had the gall to write about their concentration camp experiences? Should they have just shut up and taken it?
    Where did you get that from my post? Let people write about whatever the fuck they want, be it the existential ennui felt by the suited and booted in some random First World country (rich people have issues too), pirates vs ninjas, kinky smut, the meaning of life, really, whatever.

    I was just pointing out - like I've done admittedly way too often in here in the past - that Nobel literature prize winners tend (or tended) to fit a certain profile, in which extra-literary considerations loomed large.


    Quote Originally Posted by redheadshadz View Post
    While Corswandt's comment was crass
    Where did you read that crassness? Crass would be to say, for instance, that the books of author X are good only to wipe one's ass with.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Corswandt View Post
    I was just pointing out - like I've done admittedly way too often in here in the past - that Nobel literature prize winners tend (or tended) to fit a certain profile, in which extra-literary considerations loomed large.
    I appreciate the clarification, Corswandt, and I don't disagree with your above-noted argument. What I did have a problem with is the labeling of certain authors as "peddlers of oppression porn". I'm not the PC police, but that term struck me as so mean-spirited and insensitive (one of the definitions of "crass," by the way) that I felt compelled to comment on it. Why the venom against authors who for no fault of their own have had to endure a lot of shit in their lives?

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    I think Vila-Matas is an incredible bore and would be sorely disappointed if he won. For the rest, Daniel would probably be interested in one of the volumes of A. Trapiello's diary, La cosa en sí or El jardín de la pólvora, I can't remember which, in which Trapiello and Vila-Matas (Trapiello doesn't mention him by name, calling him instead "Mr. Preferiría no hacerlo" and insisting on his resemblance to Buster Keaton) spend a good deal of time together in Guadalajara during the famous book fair there. Mr. Preferiría no hacerlo, in Trapiello's telling, behaves ridiculously.

    As usual, I'd like to see Siegfried Lenz win. He won't, however.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    I completely agree with you here.
    Another candidate for Spain could be M. Alvaro POMBO.
    I know what you think about Mrs Isabel ALLENDE so no comment on her... but what about Mrs. Claribel ALEGRIA from Nicaragua?...
    Just for the records, M. Juan GELMAN died beginning of this year (14 January 2014) not last year... and unfortunately without the Nobel!!!
    Yes, Gelman died this year, Pacheco as well. What I meant to say is that they both died within this past year.
    In act Pacheco died only 12 days after Gelman

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    I appreciate the clarification, Corswandt, and I don't disagree with your above-noted argument. What I did have a problem with is the labeling of certain authors as "peddlers of oppression porn". I'm not the PC police, but that term struck me as so mean-spirited and insensitive (one of the definitions of "crass," by the way) that I felt compelled to comment on it. Why the venom against authors who for no fault of their own have had to endure a lot of shit in their lives?
    I'm glad we clarified everybody's point of view . I have to agree that Nobel shouldn't be labeled or assigned mostly to the kind of authors Corswandt mentions. However, there are amazing writers that can write about oppression and suffering in incredible ways. After all, XX century was a century of horrors and it needs to be depicted that way by our brightest minds at the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba View Post
    I think Vila-Matas is an incredible bore and would be sorely disappointed if he won. For the rest, Daniel would probably be interested in one of the volumes of A. Trapiello's diary, La cosa en sí or El jardín de la pólvora, I can't remember which, in which Trapiello and Vila-Matas (Trapiello doesn't mention him by name, calling him instead "Mr. Preferiría no hacerlo" and insisting on his resemblance to Buster Keaton) spend a good deal of time together in Guadalajara during the famous book fair there. Mr. Preferiría no hacerlo, in Trapiello's telling, behaves ridiculously.

    As usual, I'd like to see Siegfried Lenz win. He won't, however.
    That sounds interesting Bubba, thanks. I'll look for it.

  12. #52

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by JCamilo View Post
    C'mom, when you wrote this Ariano Suassuna was alive and Manoel de Barros still alive. Those are two great brazilian writers, so good that I hope those Nobel's crones do not try to promote themselves with Manoel.
    Even if he was still alive, I would prefer to see Ferreira Gullar winning it and I think he would have more chances to do so. Not only because I like him more, but also because I think that Ariano has the problem of being "too much Brazilian", it has too many elements of Brazilian culture and folklore, I don't know if people from other countries would be able to understand all the power of his work. (I would like to read any of Suassuna's books translated. I remember I once read a short story by Guimarães Rosa in english, it was simply horrible and soulless).

    Manoel de Barros is another great writter who should win the Nobel. His poetry is so fresh and funny, full of elements of fantasy, childhood, and nature. Unfortunately, I don't think he has real chances because of his age (98, 2 years younger than Nicanor Parra, another one of my favorites).


    Lastly, for the record, besides Suassuna, Brazil also lost (in the same week) João Ubaldo Ribeiro, a literary monster.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Septularisen View Post
    My favorite for this year will be : Haruki MURAKAMI.
    Until Murakami dies, this article will never not be relevant:

    http://www.japantoday.com/category/o...for-literature

    Both Yoshimoto and Murakami are lightweights who don't deserve it; people just talk about Murakami more.

  14. #54

    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    I think that the Goytisolos are far stronger candidates than Javier Marías. I have read Antagonia and it was hard work but a very fine piece of writing. Several of his brother's works have been translated into English. As for the others, I nominate Kadare every time (I have read twenty-two of them) but it used to be that if you win the Man Booker International you do not win the Nobel. That changed with Alice Munro but I do not see lightning striking twice in the same place.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Let me translate for you some of Luis Goytisolo's work, this excerpt comes from his book, Melty Pleasures; in this scene, some friends are meeting for lunch and having a conversation about art and politics:

    -With some politicians something similar happens: people hate them no matter what they do or do not do. And the less specific the criticisms made against them, the better.

    -They may arouse enthusiasm in some individuals here and there, but the hostility against them is felt by multitudes, Maximo said. -Just like a gigolo, or an internationally renowned playboy. They may have thousands of fans. But at any given point, the crowd could lynch them.

    -Isn't it curious, then, how nobody ever thought of lynching Franco? Corbero said. -Franco's fate was, at worst, to end up on trial as a war criminal.

    -That's because he was seen as a tyrannical father, said his former classmate. -So people did not not dare to protest. How many attempts were made ​​on Franco's life? None?

    -I would have done it if they had allowed me to, during my most militant phase, Maximo said. -But the Communist Party was not up to the task then.

    -Well, I was plotting how to do it alone when Franco died said Maica. -I remember being in the first year of college at the time.

    They had carelessly eaten and drunk too much; too much to cope with the afternoon routine with a minimally clear head, and because of that, before leaving, to offset the effect of their distracted binging, they drank some strong coffee.

    By that point, Maximo and Maica had reached the ideal state of mind, free from numbness and at the same time, unconcerned about any future problems, when, towards mid afternoon, they found themselves inside a large, quiet room, as if they were the only people, not just at that hotel, but in the whole town and, as if under the room's window, the Paseo de Gracia street were completely deserted, without any hindrance at all to stop them from focusing entirely on each other.

    They started to kiss and fondle while in the shower and they continued to do so as they fell on top of the bed, half wrapped in bath towels. Maximo was sucking her breasts, his hands between her thighs, dilating her ass with his plunging forked fingers, first with the index, then with his thumb, tracing a spiral of increasingly large circles. He abruptly flipped her over, and plunged his tongue between her buttocks, and then he plunged his fingers there once more before positioning her on all fours and, getting on his knees, proceeded to stab her over and over again, sometimes with increasing momentum, sometimes at a slower pace, in alternate turns, only to finish in a mad rush like a runaway gallop.

    He rested on her back, both out of breath, as they fell asleep, probably for no more than a few minutes, and yet, when they awoke, the sun had already disappeared behind the leaves of banana trees that swayed behind the window.
    -Jesus, said Maica. -And I had always thought that it hurt to do it there, and you had to use lubricants and stuff.
    Last edited by Cleanthess; 03-Aug-2014 at 02:03.
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by lhsl View Post
    Even if he was still alive, I would prefer to see Ferreira Gullar winning it and I think he would have more chances to do so. Not only because I like him more, but also because I think that Ariano has the problem of being "too much Brazilian", it has too many elements of Brazilian culture and folklore, I don't know if people from other countries would be able to understand all the power of his work. (I would like to read any of Suassuna's books translated. I remember I once read a short story by Guimarães Rosa in english, it was simply horrible and soulless).
    Ferreira Gullar is really average, there is like 30 years since he does not publish anything worth of note and even when he did he was considerable minor compared to the good poets of his time. But or Suassuna had/have no chance to win the nobels. Nothing to do with being filled with brazilian elements or something like this. Being the simple fact the Nobel is just self-promoting prize. Sometimes they must find a great writer or they would be ridiculous. It is the nobel, not Rosa or Suassuna, that are souless.

    Lastly, for the record, besides Suassuna, Brazil also lost (in the same week) João Ubaldo Ribeiro, a literary monster.
    And Rubems Alves.

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleanthess View Post
    Let me translate for you some of Luis Goytisolo's work, this excerpt comes from his book, Melty Pleasures; in this scene, some friends are meeting for lunch and having a conversation about art and politics:

    -With some politicians something similar happens: people hate them no matter what they do or do not do. And the less specific the criticisms made against them, the better.

    -They may arouse enthusiasm in some individuals here and there, but the hostility against them is felt by multitudes, Maximo said. -Just like a gigolo, or an internationally renowned playboy. They may have thousands of fans. But at any given point, the crowd could lynch them.

    -Isn't it curious, then, how nobody ever thought of lynching Franco? Corbero said. -Franco's fate was, at worst, to end up on trial as a war criminal.

    -That's because he was seen as a tyrannical father, said his former classmate. -So people did not not dare to protest. How many attempts were made ​​on Franco's life? None?

    -I would have done it if they had allowed me to, during my most militant phase, Maximo said. -But the Communist Party was not up to the task then.

    -Well, I was plotting how to do it alone when Franco died said Maica. -I remember being in the first year of college at the time.

    They had carelessly eaten and drunk too much; too much to cope with the afternoon routine with a minimally clear head, and because of that, before leaving, to offset the effect of their distracted binging, they drank some strong coffee.

    By that point, Maximo and Maica had reached the ideal state of mind, free from numbness and at the same time, unconcerned about any future problems, when, towards mid afternoon, they found themselves inside a large, quiet room, as if they were the only people, not just at that hotel, but in the whole town and, as if under the room's window, the Paseo de Gracia street were completely deserted, without any hindrance at all to stop them from focusing entirely on each other.

    They started to kiss and fondle while in the shower and they continued to do so as they fell on top of the bed, half wrapped in bath towels. Maximo was sucking her breasts, his hands between her thighs, dilating her ass with his plunging forked fingers, first with the index, then with his thumb, tracing a spiral of increasingly large circles. He abruptly flipped her over, and plunged his tongue between her buttocks, and then he plunged his fingers there once more before positioning her on all fours and, getting on his knees, proceeded to stab her over and over again, sometimes with increasing momentum, sometimes at a slower pace, in alternate turns, only to finish in a mad rush like a runaway gallop.

    He rested on her back, both out of breath, as they fell asleep, probably for no more than a few minutes, and yet, when they awoke, the sun had already disappeared behind the leaves of banana trees that swayed behind the window.
    -Jesus, said Maica. -And I had always thought that it hurt to do it there, and you had to use lubricants and stuff.
    Thanks for the translation, Cleanthess. Politics, sex, and a little humor in one short passage. Would you say all three of those things are common aspects of Goytisolo's writing? Also, although I only have this one piece to go by, his work seems to have potential commercial appeal. Any idea why Goytisolo isn't better-translated in English?

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    Thanks for the translation, Cleanthess. Politics, sex, and a little humor in one short passage. Would you say all three of those things are common aspects of Goytisolo's writing? Also, although I only have this one piece to go by, his work seems to have potential commercial appeal. Any idea why Goytisolo isn't better-translated in English?
    StevieB, long time no talk!


    You're absolutely right, LG has some commercial appeal. Once I started reading Melty Pleasures I couldn't put the book down, and I finished it in one sitting. That novel reads like a funny collaboration between Nicholson Baker and his highbrow porn and Amelie Nothomb and her intellectual noir romans, such as Barbe Bleue.


    LG uses an omniscient narrator technique with access to characters' simplified and stylized streams of consciousness, jumps back in forth in time and between characters' POVs to portray every character as a little bit sympathetic and a little bit unappealing. To know everything is to forgive everything, after all. LG also uses lots of foreshadowing (for example the little excerpt I translated prefigures both the ending and the surprise ending of the novel.)


    The other LG book I've read, Antagonia, belongs to a different mixture of genres, but it is also brilliantly written and entertainingly put together; maybe I'll translate later a little funny excerpt from chapter 5 of the fourth novel from that tetralogy.
    Last edited by Cleanthess; 03-Aug-2014 at 18:19.
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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel del Real View Post
    Yes, Gelman died this year, Pacheco as well. What I meant to say is that they both died within this past year.
    In act Pacheco died only 12 days after Gelman
    Ok I understand better now.
    What about Claribel ALEGRIA?

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    Default Re: Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 Speculation

    Quote Originally Posted by nagisa View Post
    Until Murakami dies, this article will never not be relevant:

    http://www.japantoday.com/category/o...for-literature

    Both Yoshimoto and Murakami are lightweights who don't deserve it; people just talk about Murakami more.
    I don't understand exactly what you mean by "lightweight" regarding Mr. Haruki MURAKAMI, but I can guarantee you that : If not this year, this writer will be award the Nobel until the next five year!...

    So, if MURAKAMI will not be Nobel Prize this year, I will put my money on ADONIS!...

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